UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

How reliable are Hounsfield-unit measurements in forensic radiology?


Ruder, Thomas D; Thali, Yannick; Schindera, Sebastian T; Dalla Torre, Simon A; Zech, Wolf Dieter; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen; Hatch, Gary M (2012). How reliable are Hounsfield-unit measurements in forensic radiology? Forensic Science International, 220(1-3):219-223.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of computed tomography (CT) numbers, also known as Hounsfield-units (HU) in the differentiation and identification of forensically relevant materials and to provide instructions to improve the reproducibility of HU measurements in daily forensic practice.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We scanned a phantom containing non-organic materials (glass, rocks and metals) on three different CT scanners with standardized parameters. The t-test was used to assess the influence of the scanner, the size and shape of different types of regions-of-interest (ROI), the composition and shape of the object, and the reader performance on HU measurements. Intra-class correlation coefficient was used to assess intra- and inter-reader reliability.
RESULTS: HU values did not change significantly as a function of ROI-shape or -size (p>0.05). Intra-reader reliability reached ICC values >0.929 (p<0.001). Inter-reader reliability was also excellent with an ICC of 0.994 (p<0.001). Four of seven objects yielded significantly different CT numbers at different levels within the object (p<0.05). In 6/7 objects the HU changed significantly from CT scanner to CT scanner (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION: Reproducible CT number measurements can be achieved through correct ROI-placement and repeat measurements within the object of interest. However, HU may differ from CT-scanner to CT-scanner. In order to obtain comparable CT numbers we suggest that a dedicated Forensic Reference Phantom be developed.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of computed tomography (CT) numbers, also known as Hounsfield-units (HU) in the differentiation and identification of forensically relevant materials and to provide instructions to improve the reproducibility of HU measurements in daily forensic practice.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We scanned a phantom containing non-organic materials (glass, rocks and metals) on three different CT scanners with standardized parameters. The t-test was used to assess the influence of the scanner, the size and shape of different types of regions-of-interest (ROI), the composition and shape of the object, and the reader performance on HU measurements. Intra-class correlation coefficient was used to assess intra- and inter-reader reliability.
RESULTS: HU values did not change significantly as a function of ROI-shape or -size (p>0.05). Intra-reader reliability reached ICC values >0.929 (p<0.001). Inter-reader reliability was also excellent with an ICC of 0.994 (p<0.001). Four of seven objects yielded significantly different CT numbers at different levels within the object (p<0.05). In 6/7 objects the HU changed significantly from CT scanner to CT scanner (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION: Reproducible CT number measurements can be achieved through correct ROI-placement and repeat measurements within the object of interest. However, HU may differ from CT-scanner to CT-scanner. In order to obtain comparable CT numbers we suggest that a dedicated Forensic Reference Phantom be developed.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:03 Oct 2012 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0379-0738
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2012.03.004
PubMed ID:22534158

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations