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Spinal cord injury: one-year evolution of motor-evoked potentials and recovery of leg motor function in 255 patients


Petersen, J A; Spiess, M; Curt, A; Dietz, V; Schubert, M (2012). Spinal cord injury: one-year evolution of motor-evoked potentials and recovery of leg motor function in 255 patients. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 26(8):939-948.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: . The description of the natural course of recovery from a spinal cord injury (SCI) with spontaneous improvement of neurological, neurophysiological, and functional measures is an important prerequisite in appraising effects of upcoming interventional therapies.
OBJECTIVE: . To describe the spontaneous evolution of motor-evoked potentials of the anterior tibial muscle (TA-MEP) and their relation to outcomes of lower extremity motor scores (LEMS) and walking function in patients recovering from an acute SCI.
METHODS: . TA-MEPs were assessed in 255 SCI subjects within 5 time intervals throughout the first year after SCI with combined neurological and functional measures. Tibial nerve conduction studies were performed to screen for peripheral nerve damage.
RESULTS: . TA-MEP allowed stratification of SCI according to lesion severity and outcome. As MEP amplitudes increased over 12 months after SCI, this was paralleled by a significant improvement of LEMS and walking function. TA-MEP latencies remained usually stable.
CONCLUSION: . Clinical outcome and walking function after SCI can be predicted independent of clinical measures by assessment of TA-MEP reflecting corticospinal tract integrity.

BACKGROUND: . The description of the natural course of recovery from a spinal cord injury (SCI) with spontaneous improvement of neurological, neurophysiological, and functional measures is an important prerequisite in appraising effects of upcoming interventional therapies.
OBJECTIVE: . To describe the spontaneous evolution of motor-evoked potentials of the anterior tibial muscle (TA-MEP) and their relation to outcomes of lower extremity motor scores (LEMS) and walking function in patients recovering from an acute SCI.
METHODS: . TA-MEPs were assessed in 255 SCI subjects within 5 time intervals throughout the first year after SCI with combined neurological and functional measures. Tibial nerve conduction studies were performed to screen for peripheral nerve damage.
RESULTS: . TA-MEP allowed stratification of SCI according to lesion severity and outcome. As MEP amplitudes increased over 12 months after SCI, this was paralleled by a significant improvement of LEMS and walking function. TA-MEP latencies remained usually stable.
CONCLUSION: . Clinical outcome and walking function after SCI can be predicted independent of clinical measures by assessment of TA-MEP reflecting corticospinal tract integrity.

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18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:08 Oct 2012 14:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:58
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:1545-9683
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968312438437
PubMed ID:22460611
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-64995

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