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Ecology. Bird navigation--computing orthodromes.


Wehner, R (2001). Ecology. Bird navigation--computing orthodromes. Science, 291(5502):264-265.

Abstract

There are many theories about how migrating birds navigate as Wehner explains in his Perspective. He discusses new findings obtained with radar on a Canadian coast guard icebreaker vessel, which show that Arctic seabirds are able to faithfully follow the great-circle (orthodrome) routes of far northern latitudes most probably by steering with their sun compass while keeping their internal clock out of phase with local time (Alerstam et al.).

There are many theories about how migrating birds navigate as Wehner explains in his Perspective. He discusses new findings obtained with radar on a Canadian coast guard icebreaker vessel, which show that Arctic seabirds are able to faithfully follow the great-circle (orthodrome) routes of far northern latitudes most probably by steering with their sun compass while keeping their internal clock out of phase with local time (Alerstam et al.).

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:12 January 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
ISSN:0036-8075
Publisher DOI:10.1126/science.1058147
PubMed ID:11253217

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