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Increased UV-induced sister-chromatid exchange in cultured fibroblasts of first-degree relatives of melanoma patients


Knees-Matzen, Susanne; Roser, Marianne; Reimers, Uta; Ehlert, Ulrike; Weichenthal, Michael; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Rüdiger, Hugo W (1991). Increased UV-induced sister-chromatid exchange in cultured fibroblasts of first-degree relatives of melanoma patients. Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, 53(2):265-270.

Abstract

Cultured fibroblasts of 17 first-degree relatives of familial melanoma patients and six first- degree relatives of cutaneous melanoma (CMM) patients with multiple CMM primaries were tested for in vitro sensitivity to UV light. Fibroblasts of nine familial CMM patients with a known UV-sensitivity and 19 healthy probands served as a control. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) was used as a parameter to detect UV-induced genotoxic damage. We found significantly (p < 0.001) increased UV-induced SCE levels in familial melanoma patients, as well as in first- degree relatives of familial melanoma patients (p < 0.001) after UV-A,B irradiation (375 J/m2), compared to the healthy probands without a family history of CMM. A significant (p < 0.001) increase of UV-induced SCE was also observed in the relatives of CMM patients with multiple CMM primaries. In addition, the spontaneous SCE were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in familial CMM patients. This study shows that increased UV sensitivity is a familial phenome- non. It is consistent with the concept of a genetic predisposition to CMM, which is based on
increased UV sensitivity and may help to define groups with an elevated risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma.

Cultured fibroblasts of 17 first-degree relatives of familial melanoma patients and six first- degree relatives of cutaneous melanoma (CMM) patients with multiple CMM primaries were tested for in vitro sensitivity to UV light. Fibroblasts of nine familial CMM patients with a known UV-sensitivity and 19 healthy probands served as a control. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) was used as a parameter to detect UV-induced genotoxic damage. We found significantly (p < 0.001) increased UV-induced SCE levels in familial melanoma patients, as well as in first- degree relatives of familial melanoma patients (p < 0.001) after UV-A,B irradiation (375 J/m2), compared to the healthy probands without a family history of CMM. A significant (p < 0.001) increase of UV-induced SCE was also observed in the relatives of CMM patients with multiple CMM primaries. In addition, the spontaneous SCE were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in familial CMM patients. This study shows that increased UV sensitivity is a familial phenome- non. It is consistent with the concept of a genetic predisposition to CMM, which is based on
increased UV sensitivity and may help to define groups with an elevated risk of developing cutaneous malignant melanoma.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1991
Deposited On:12 Oct 2012 13:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:59
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-4608
Publisher DOI:10.1016/0165-4608(91)90103-2

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