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Onset and maintenance of psychiatric disorders after serious accidents


Kühn, Manuela; Ehlert, Ulrike; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; Backhaus, Jutta; Hohagen, Fritz; Broocks, Andreas (2006). Onset and maintenance of psychiatric disorders after serious accidents. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciene, 256(8):497-503.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the onset, course, and remission of psychiatric disorders in the first 6 months after a serious accident for consecutive patients in a hospital emergency department. Participants were 58 patients aged 18–65 who were assessed shortly after attending a hospital emergency department and were followed up 6 months afterwards. Patients were interviewed with regard to past and current psychiatric history using different instruments (e.g. SCID for DSM-IV).
Prior to their accidents, 35% of all subjects had experienced one or more psychiatric disorders (lifetime prevalence). Shortly after the accident, the incidence of Acute Stress Disorder (7%), subsyndromal Acute Stress Disorder (12%), and adjustment disorder (1.5%) was increased as a reaction to the accident. At this time, 29% of all patients suffered from an acute psychiatric disorder. Six-months after the accident, 10% of the subjects met criteria for Major Depression, 6% for PTSD, 4% for subsyndromal PTSD, and 1.5% for Specific Phobia as newly developed disorders. The course of the psychiatric disorders shows that those patients who met criteria for any psychiatric diagnosis shortly after the accident ran a much higher risk for developing new or comorbid psychiatric disorders in the future.

The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the onset, course, and remission of psychiatric disorders in the first 6 months after a serious accident for consecutive patients in a hospital emergency department. Participants were 58 patients aged 18–65 who were assessed shortly after attending a hospital emergency department and were followed up 6 months afterwards. Patients were interviewed with regard to past and current psychiatric history using different instruments (e.g. SCID for DSM-IV).
Prior to their accidents, 35% of all subjects had experienced one or more psychiatric disorders (lifetime prevalence). Shortly after the accident, the incidence of Acute Stress Disorder (7%), subsyndromal Acute Stress Disorder (12%), and adjustment disorder (1.5%) was increased as a reaction to the accident. At this time, 29% of all patients suffered from an acute psychiatric disorder. Six-months after the accident, 10% of the subjects met criteria for Major Depression, 6% for PTSD, 4% for subsyndromal PTSD, and 1.5% for Specific Phobia as newly developed disorders. The course of the psychiatric disorders shows that those patients who met criteria for any psychiatric diagnosis shortly after the accident ran a much higher risk for developing new or comorbid psychiatric disorders in the future.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:posttraumatic Stress Disorder , PTSD , accidents , traumatology , injury
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:15 Oct 2012 12:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:59
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-1334
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-006-0670-6

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