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Diehl, Michael; Jonas, Klaus (1991). Measures of national stereotypes as predictors of the latencies of inductive versus deductive stereotypic judgements. European Journal of Social Psychology, 21(4):317-330.

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Abstract

According to Taifel's accentuation theory, national stereotypes can be thought of as the correlation between trait dimensions and national affiliations, This correlation is high when the trait shows high homogeneity within and high distinctiveness between the national groups. The present study tested the hypothesis that a trait's distinctiveness would facilitate inductive stereotypic judgements (inferences from trait to nationality) whereas homogeneity would facilitate deductive stereotypic judgements (inferences from nationality to trait). The latencies of inductive and deductive stereotypic judgements of 48 German subjects were assessed for 39 traits and three foreign nationalities (English, French, Italian). Multiple regression analyses using latencies for both types of judgements us criterion variables and both distinctiveness and homogeneity as predictor variables were conducted. The stereotype measures of Katz and Braly and McCauley and Stitt served as additional predictor variables. As expected from accentuation theory, distinctiveness predicted inductive but not deductive latencies, whereas homogeneity predicted deductive but not inductive latencies. For the latencies of deductive stereotypic judgements, the stereotype measure of Katz and Braly as well as that of McCauley and Stitt also proved to be significant predictors. The results are discussed and recommendations are given with respect to the assessment of national stereotypes.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
DDC:150 Psychology
Date:1991
Deposited On:23 Oct 2012 13:07
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 23:52
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0046-2772
Publisher DOI:10.1002/ejsp.2420210405
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 14
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