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Attitudinal Ambivalence


Jonas, Klaus; Broemer, Philip; Diehl, Michael (2000). Attitudinal Ambivalence. European Review of Social Psychology, 11(1):35-74.

Abstract

The concept of attitudinal ambivalence refers to the degree to which an attitude object is evaluated positively and negatively at the same time. As is argued in the present chapter,ambivalence is an aspect of attitude strength which is likely to have consequences with respect to its impact on information processing,the persistence of the respective attitude,its resistance to persuasion, as well as the relationship between the attitude and relevant behavior. For example, attitudes are assumed to be less temporarily stable and to correspond less well with pertinent behaviors at higher levels of ambivalence. However, depending upon which operational approachto measuring ambivalence is adopted, different processes and consequences are to be expected. Our hypotheses are discussed in the light of relevant research.

The concept of attitudinal ambivalence refers to the degree to which an attitude object is evaluated positively and negatively at the same time. As is argued in the present chapter,ambivalence is an aspect of attitude strength which is likely to have consequences with respect to its impact on information processing,the persistence of the respective attitude,its resistance to persuasion, as well as the relationship between the attitude and relevant behavior. For example, attitudes are assumed to be less temporarily stable and to correspond less well with pertinent behaviors at higher levels of ambivalence. However, depending upon which operational approachto measuring ambivalence is adopted, different processes and consequences are to be expected. Our hypotheses are discussed in the light of relevant research.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2000
Deposited On:24 Oct 2012 09:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:01
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1046-3283
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/14792779943000125

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