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Pain and psychological health status in chronic pain patients with migration background-the Zurich study


Kellner, Ulla; Halder, Christine; Litschi, Martin; Sprott, Haiko (2013). Pain and psychological health status in chronic pain patients with migration background-the Zurich study. Clinical Rheumatology, 32(2):189-197.

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate whether there were differences in pain and psychological health status in chronic pain patients with and without migration background before and after an 8-week interdisciplinary outpatient pain programme (IOPP). One hundred eighteen consecutively assessed patients were included. Pain and psychological health were recorded prior to and after the intervention, and at the 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. The migrant group experienced a statistically significant and clinically relevant higher amount of pain and worse psychological functioning than the non-migrant group at all time points. Statistically significant differences between the groups for the variables depression, anxiety, kinesiophobia and passive coping, in particular catastrophizing, were observed in the short and long term. The non-migrant group improved continuously on all outcome measurements at all time points. The results show differences in outcome for chronic pain patients with and without migration background. High pain intensity, high levels of depression, anxiety and catastrophizing at baseline appear to be major barriers for improvement in a sample of migrant patients when participating in an IOPP. Treatments may have to be tailored to the specific needs of this patient group to better address their poor psychological health status and to improve the course of the pain disorder.

The objective of this paper is to investigate whether there were differences in pain and psychological health status in chronic pain patients with and without migration background before and after an 8-week interdisciplinary outpatient pain programme (IOPP). One hundred eighteen consecutively assessed patients were included. Pain and psychological health were recorded prior to and after the intervention, and at the 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. The migrant group experienced a statistically significant and clinically relevant higher amount of pain and worse psychological functioning than the non-migrant group at all time points. Statistically significant differences between the groups for the variables depression, anxiety, kinesiophobia and passive coping, in particular catastrophizing, were observed in the short and long term. The non-migrant group improved continuously on all outcome measurements at all time points. The results show differences in outcome for chronic pain patients with and without migration background. High pain intensity, high levels of depression, anxiety and catastrophizing at baseline appear to be major barriers for improvement in a sample of migrant patients when participating in an IOPP. Treatments may have to be tailored to the specific needs of this patient group to better address their poor psychological health status and to improve the course of the pain disorder.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:25 Oct 2012 12:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0770-3198
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10067-012-2099-9
PubMed ID:23053691

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