UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Differential neurobiological effects of expert advice on risky choice in adolescents and adults


Engelmann, J B; Moore, S; Monica Capra, C; Berns, G S (2012). Differential neurobiological effects of expert advice on risky choice in adolescents and adults. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 7(5):557-567.

Abstract

We investigated behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms by which risk-averse advice,provided by an expert, affected risky decisions across three developmental groups [earlyadolescents (12-14 years), late adolescents (15-17 years), adults (18+ years)]. Using cumulativeprospect theory, we modeled choice behavior during a risky-choice task. Results indicate thatadvice had a significantly greater impact on risky choice in both adolescent groups than in adults.Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of thisbehavioral effect. Developmental effects on correlations between brain activity and valuationparameters were obtained in regions that can be classified into (i) cognitive control regions, such asdorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and ventrolateral PFC; (ii) social cognition regions, such asposterior temporoparietal junction; and (iii) reward-related regions, such as ventromedial PFC(vmPFC) and ventral striatum. Within these regions, differential effects of advice on neuralcorrelates of valuation were observed across development. Specifically, advice increased thecorrelation strength between brain activity and parameters reflective of safe choice options inadolescent DLPFC and decreased correlation strength between activity and parameters reflective ofrisky choice options in adult vmPFC. Taken together, results indicate that, across development,distinct brain systems involved in cognitive control and valuation mediate the risk-reducing effectof advice during decision making under risk via specific enhancements and reductions of thecorrelation strength between brain activity and valuation parameters.

Abstract

We investigated behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms by which risk-averse advice,provided by an expert, affected risky decisions across three developmental groups [earlyadolescents (12-14 years), late adolescents (15-17 years), adults (18+ years)]. Using cumulativeprospect theory, we modeled choice behavior during a risky-choice task. Results indicate thatadvice had a significantly greater impact on risky choice in both adolescent groups than in adults.Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of thisbehavioral effect. Developmental effects on correlations between brain activity and valuationparameters were obtained in regions that can be classified into (i) cognitive control regions, such asdorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and ventrolateral PFC; (ii) social cognition regions, such asposterior temporoparietal junction; and (iii) reward-related regions, such as ventromedial PFC(vmPFC) and ventral striatum. Within these regions, differential effects of advice on neuralcorrelates of valuation were observed across development. Specifically, advice increased thecorrelation strength between brain activity and parameters reflective of safe choice options inadolescent DLPFC and decreased correlation strength between activity and parameters reflective ofrisky choice options in adult vmPFC. Taken together, results indicate that, across development,distinct brain systems involved in cognitive control and valuation mediate the risk-reducing effectof advice during decision making under risk via specific enhancements and reductions of thecorrelation strength between brain activity and valuation parameters.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 05 Nov 2012
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Nov 2012 13:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:03
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1749-5016
Additional Information: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci (2012) 7 (5): 557-567. doi: 10.1093/scan/nss050] is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nss050.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nss050
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:7384

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 767kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations