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Strength-Based positive interventions: further evidence for their potential in enhancing well-being and alleviating depression


Gander, Fabian; Proyer, Rene T; Ruch, Willibald; Wyss, Tobias (2013). Strength-Based positive interventions: further evidence for their potential in enhancing well-being and alleviating depression. Journal of Happiness Studies, 14(4):1241-1259.

Abstract

The impact of nine strengths-based positive interventions on well-being and depression was examined in an Internet-based randomized placebo-controlled study. The aims of the study were to: (1) replicate findings on the effectiveness of the gratitude visit, three good things, and using character strengths interventions; (2) test variants of inter- ventions (noting three good things for 2 weeks; combining the gratitude visit and three good things interventions; and noting three funny things for a week); and (3) test the effectiveness of the counting kindness, gift of time, and another door opens-interventions in an online setting. A total of 622 adults subjected themselves to one of the nine interven- tions or to a placebo control exercise (early memories) and thereafter estimated their degrees of happiness and depression at five times (pre- and post-test, 1-, 3-, and 6 months follow-up). Eight of the nine interventions increased happiness; depression was decreased in all groups, including the placebo control group. We conclude that happiness can be enhanced through some ‘‘strengths-based’’ interventions. Possible mechanisms for the effectiveness of the interventions are discussed.

The impact of nine strengths-based positive interventions on well-being and depression was examined in an Internet-based randomized placebo-controlled study. The aims of the study were to: (1) replicate findings on the effectiveness of the gratitude visit, three good things, and using character strengths interventions; (2) test variants of inter- ventions (noting three good things for 2 weeks; combining the gratitude visit and three good things interventions; and noting three funny things for a week); and (3) test the effectiveness of the counting kindness, gift of time, and another door opens-interventions in an online setting. A total of 622 adults subjected themselves to one of the nine interven- tions or to a placebo control exercise (early memories) and thereafter estimated their degrees of happiness and depression at five times (pre- and post-test, 1-, 3-, and 6 months follow-up). Eight of the nine interventions increased happiness; depression was decreased in all groups, including the placebo control group. We conclude that happiness can be enhanced through some ‘‘strengths-based’’ interventions. Possible mechanisms for the effectiveness of the interventions are discussed.

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28 citations in Web of Science®
31 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2013
Deposited On:09 Nov 2012 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:04
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1389-4978
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10902-012-9380-0
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-66379

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