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Automated analysis of the temporal behavior of the double Intertropical Convergence Zone over the east Pacific


Henke, Daniel; Smyth, Padhraic; Haffke, Colene; Magnusdottir, Gudrun (2012). Automated analysis of the temporal behavior of the double Intertropical Convergence Zone over the east Pacific. Remote Sensing of Environment, 123:418-433.

Abstract

This paper presents new methods for an automated analysis of the double InterTropical Convergence Zone (dITCZ) phenomena on a daily time scale over the east Pacific. Long-term Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible and infrared data are used to spatially identify and segment the convection zones over the east Pacific basin on both sides of the equator and to track the temporal variability of the ITCZ, specifically to identify cases of dITCZs, northern or southern ITCZ, or non-presence events. For the segmentation approach, image processing techniques are developed to extract information about the spatial features of the ITCZ in both hemispheres for each satellite image. These features serve as input to a temporal classification algorithm that is based on a combination of hidden semi Markov model (HsMM) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. The performance of the proposed method is competitive with human experts and the methodology can thus be used to conduct an in-depth analysis of the dITCZ. Such an analysis could provide precise information for refining existing weather and climate models over the sparsely observed east Pacific where the dITCZ is greatly over-represented in most models.

This paper presents new methods for an automated analysis of the double InterTropical Convergence Zone (dITCZ) phenomena on a daily time scale over the east Pacific. Long-term Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible and infrared data are used to spatially identify and segment the convection zones over the east Pacific basin on both sides of the equator and to track the temporal variability of the ITCZ, specifically to identify cases of dITCZs, northern or southern ITCZ, or non-presence events. For the segmentation approach, image processing techniques are developed to extract information about the spatial features of the ITCZ in both hemispheres for each satellite image. These features serve as input to a temporal classification algorithm that is based on a combination of hidden semi Markov model (HsMM) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. The performance of the proposed method is competitive with human experts and the methodology can thus be used to conduct an in-depth analysis of the dITCZ. Such an analysis could provide precise information for refining existing weather and climate models over the sparsely observed east Pacific where the dITCZ is greatly over-represented in most models.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:13 Nov 2012 13:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0034-4257
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2012.03.022
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-66458

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