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Dyadic Coping, Insecure Attachment, and Cortisol Stress Recovery Following Experimentally Induced Stress


Meuwly, Nathalie; Bodenmann, Guy; Germann, Janine; Bradbury, Thomas N; Ditzen, Beate; Heinrichs, Markus (2012). Dyadic Coping, Insecure Attachment, and Cortisol Stress Recovery Following Experimentally Induced Stress. Journal of Family Psychology, 26(6):937-947.

Abstract

Evidence for the stress-buffering effects of social support in intimate relationships raises important questions about whether partner support promotes recovery in physiological systems implicated in physical health. The present study examined (a) whether observed dyadic coping enhances cortisol stress recovery and (b) whether a stressed partner's self-reported attachment anxiety and avoidance moderate these effects. Stress was experimentally induced by asking either the man or woman in 123 heterosexual couples to participate in a standardized public speaking task. Stressed individuals recovered faster from stress the more positive dyadic coping they received from the partner, with women high in attachment anxiety benefiting less from these behaviors. Attachment avoidance did not moderate these associations. This study highlights the value of examining the interplay between partners' behaviors and attachment orientations in order to understand the impact of stress on close relationships and partners' health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

Abstract

Evidence for the stress-buffering effects of social support in intimate relationships raises important questions about whether partner support promotes recovery in physiological systems implicated in physical health. The present study examined (a) whether observed dyadic coping enhances cortisol stress recovery and (b) whether a stressed partner's self-reported attachment anxiety and avoidance moderate these effects. Stress was experimentally induced by asking either the man or woman in 123 heterosexual couples to participate in a standardized public speaking task. Stressed individuals recovered faster from stress the more positive dyadic coping they received from the partner, with women high in attachment anxiety benefiting less from these behaviors. Attachment avoidance did not moderate these associations. This study highlights the value of examining the interplay between partners' behaviors and attachment orientations in order to understand the impact of stress on close relationships and partners' health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

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18 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychotherapeutisches Zentrum des Psychologischen Instituts UZH
Date:2012
Deposited On:13 Nov 2012 11:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:04
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0893-3200
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0030356
PubMed ID:23127351

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