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Synchronization between temporal and parietal cortex during multimodal object processing in man


von Stein, A; Rappelsberger, P; Sarnthein, J; Petsche, H (1999). Synchronization between temporal and parietal cortex during multimodal object processing in man. Cerebral Cortex, 9(2):137-150.

Abstract

A series of recordings in cat visual cortex suggest that synchronous activity in neuronal cell ensembles serves to bind the different perceptual qualities belonging to one object. We provide evidence that similar mechanisms seem also to be observable in human subjects for the representation of supramodal entities. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 19 scalp electrodes (10/20 system) in 19 human subjects and EEG amplitude and coherence were determined during presentation of objects such as house, tree, ball. Objects were presented in three different ways: in a pictorial presentation, as spoken words and as written words. In order to find correlates of modality-independent processing, we searched for patterns of activation common to all three modalities of presentation. The common pattern turned out to be an increase of coherence between temporal and parietal electrodes in the 13-18 Hz beta1 frequency range. This is evidence that population activity of temporal cortex and parietal cortex shows enhanced coherence during presentation of semantic entities. Coherent activity in this low-frequency range might play a role for binding of multimodal ensembles.

A series of recordings in cat visual cortex suggest that synchronous activity in neuronal cell ensembles serves to bind the different perceptual qualities belonging to one object. We provide evidence that similar mechanisms seem also to be observable in human subjects for the representation of supramodal entities. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 19 scalp electrodes (10/20 system) in 19 human subjects and EEG amplitude and coherence were determined during presentation of objects such as house, tree, ball. Objects were presented in three different ways: in a pictorial presentation, as spoken words and as written words. In order to find correlates of modality-independent processing, we searched for patterns of activation common to all three modalities of presentation. The common pattern turned out to be an increase of coherence between temporal and parietal electrodes in the 13-18 Hz beta1 frequency range. This is evidence that population activity of temporal cortex and parietal cortex shows enhanced coherence during presentation of semantic entities. Coherent activity in this low-frequency range might play a role for binding of multimodal ensembles.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 1999
Deposited On:25 Mar 2009 16:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:38
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1047-3211
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1093/cercor/9.2.137
Official URL:http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/9/2/137
PubMed ID:10220226
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6690

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