UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Critical review and guidelines for management


Pecoraro, Felice; Rancic, Zoran; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Pfammatter, Thomas; Bajardi, Guido; Veith, Frank J (2013). Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Critical review and guidelines for management. Annals of Vascular Surgery, 27(1):113-122.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: CMI is caused by chronic occlusive disease of mesenteric arteries. In such an uncommon disease, clear recommendations are strongly needed. Unfortunately, treatment options for symptomatic CMI are still controversial and no guidelines exist. METHODS: A systematic literature review of the last 25-years was conducted through MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Review/Trials register to identify studies reporting on CMI treatment with more than 10 patients. Primary outcomes were perioperative mortality and morbidity rates. Secondary outcomes were survival rates, primary and secondary patency rates, vessels treated, CMI recurrence, follow-up (FU), technical success (TS), and in-hospital length of stay (InH-LOS). Patients were divided into endovascular treatment (ET) or open treatment (OT) groups. Subsequently, primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by study publication year for the interval periods 1986-2000 ("A") and 2001-2010 ("B"). Differences were assessed using the t-test and the χ(2) test. RESULTS: Forty-three articles with 1,795 patients were included. Perioperative mortality and morbidity rates were lower in the ET group. No difference in survival rate was observed. Primary and secondary patencies were superior in the OT group. A greater number of vessels were revascularized in the OT group. CMI recurrence was more frequent in the ET group. FU was longer in the OT group. TS was superior in the OT group and InH-LOS was shorter in the ET group. A higher number of patients were treated by ET in the period "A." No differences in mortality and morbidity were observed between period "A" and "B" in ET and OT groups. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the lower periprocedural mortality and morbidity after ET, this approach should be considered as the first treatment option in most CMI patients, especially in those with severe malnutrition. Primary OT should be restricted to cases that do not qualify for ET or good surgical risk patients with long life expectancy. Considering better long-term results of OT, ET treatment should be considered as a bridge therapy to OT in some patients requiring retreatment if ET does not preclude subsequent OT.

BACKGROUND: CMI is caused by chronic occlusive disease of mesenteric arteries. In such an uncommon disease, clear recommendations are strongly needed. Unfortunately, treatment options for symptomatic CMI are still controversial and no guidelines exist. METHODS: A systematic literature review of the last 25-years was conducted through MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Review/Trials register to identify studies reporting on CMI treatment with more than 10 patients. Primary outcomes were perioperative mortality and morbidity rates. Secondary outcomes were survival rates, primary and secondary patency rates, vessels treated, CMI recurrence, follow-up (FU), technical success (TS), and in-hospital length of stay (InH-LOS). Patients were divided into endovascular treatment (ET) or open treatment (OT) groups. Subsequently, primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by study publication year for the interval periods 1986-2000 ("A") and 2001-2010 ("B"). Differences were assessed using the t-test and the χ(2) test. RESULTS: Forty-three articles with 1,795 patients were included. Perioperative mortality and morbidity rates were lower in the ET group. No difference in survival rate was observed. Primary and secondary patencies were superior in the OT group. A greater number of vessels were revascularized in the OT group. CMI recurrence was more frequent in the ET group. FU was longer in the OT group. TS was superior in the OT group and InH-LOS was shorter in the ET group. A higher number of patients were treated by ET in the period "A." No differences in mortality and morbidity were observed between period "A" and "B" in ET and OT groups. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the lower periprocedural mortality and morbidity after ET, this approach should be considered as the first treatment option in most CMI patients, especially in those with severe malnutrition. Primary OT should be restricted to cases that do not qualify for ET or good surgical risk patients with long life expectancy. Considering better long-term results of OT, ET treatment should be considered as a bridge therapy to OT in some patients requiring retreatment if ET does not preclude subsequent OT.

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 30 Nov 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Angiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:30 Nov 2012 13:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0890-5096
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2012.05.012
PubMed ID:23088809
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-67062

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 614kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations