UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mental rotation of primate hands: human-likeness and thumb saliency


Bläsing, B; de Castro Campos, M; Schack, T; Brugger, P (2012). Mental rotation of primate hands: human-likeness and thumb saliency. Experimental Brain Research, 221(1):93-105.

Abstract

Mental rotation of human hands has been found to differ essentially from mental rotation of objects in such a way that reaction times and error rates of handedness judgements are influenced by the comfort and familiarity of the presented hand postures. To investigate the role of the similarity of the presented hands to the participant's own hand, we used different primates' hands as stimuli in a mental rotation task. Five out of 24 primate hands were chosen for their ratings in human-likeness and saliency of the thumb according to a questionnaire study and presented in two mental rotation experiments; in the second experiment, they were modified in such a way that all hands appeared thumbless. Results of both experiments revealed effects of species and orientation on reaction times, and an interaction between species and hand side occurred in the second experiment. In the first experiment, the thumbless Colobus hand differed from all other hands, showing the highest reaction times and error rates and failing to show the expected medial-over-lateral advantage. In the second experiment, the eccentricity of the Colobus hand was decreased and the facilitating effect of human-likeness was slightly increased. We conclude that motor strategies were applied that relied less on the asymmetry of the stimuli but rather on their similarity to the human hand. We argue that motor simulation might facilitate the processing of incomplete stimuli by mentally completing them, especially if all stimuli can be processed in a consistent manner.

Mental rotation of human hands has been found to differ essentially from mental rotation of objects in such a way that reaction times and error rates of handedness judgements are influenced by the comfort and familiarity of the presented hand postures. To investigate the role of the similarity of the presented hands to the participant's own hand, we used different primates' hands as stimuli in a mental rotation task. Five out of 24 primate hands were chosen for their ratings in human-likeness and saliency of the thumb according to a questionnaire study and presented in two mental rotation experiments; in the second experiment, they were modified in such a way that all hands appeared thumbless. Results of both experiments revealed effects of species and orientation on reaction times, and an interaction between species and hand side occurred in the second experiment. In the first experiment, the thumbless Colobus hand differed from all other hands, showing the highest reaction times and error rates and failing to show the expected medial-over-lateral advantage. In the second experiment, the eccentricity of the Colobus hand was decreased and the facilitating effect of human-likeness was slightly increased. We conclude that motor strategies were applied that relied less on the asymmetry of the stimuli but rather on their similarity to the human hand. We argue that motor simulation might facilitate the processing of incomplete stimuli by mentally completing them, especially if all stimuli can be processed in a consistent manner.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 29 Nov 2012
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:29 Nov 2012 14:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:07
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Experimental Brain Research
ISSN:0014-4819
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3151-3
PubMed ID:22766845
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-67367

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 593kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations