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Test-retest reliability of contact heat-evoked potentials from cervical dermatomes


Kramer, John L K; Taylor, Philippa; Haefeli, Jenny; Blum, Julia; Zariffa, Jose; Curt, Armin; Steeves, John (2012). Test-retest reliability of contact heat-evoked potentials from cervical dermatomes. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, 29(1):70-75.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability of contact heat-evoked potentials (CHEPs) in neurologically healthy subjects from cervical dermatomes (C4-C8). Seventeen individuals underwent test-retest examination of cervical CHEPs. Peak latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude of N2-P2 and ratings of perceived intensity were analyzed using test-retest reliability statistics (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] and Bland-Altman confidence parameters). For comparison, a group of similar age and gender was also examined with dermatomal somatosensory-evoked potentials (dSSEPs, n = 17). The ICC values for CHEP latency and amplitude parameters were significant (P < 0.05) and corresponded to at least "fair" reliability, while peak-to-peak amplitude demonstrated "substantial" (≥0.81) reliability for all dermatomes. The coefficients of repeatability (i.e., 2SD of the difference between examinations) confirm that CHEPs and dSSEPs are reliable according to measures of latency. Superior peak-to-peak amplitude test-retest reliability was found for CHEPs. In conclusion, the test-retest reliability of dSSEP and CHEP parameters supports the fact that these outcomes can be used to objectively track changes in spinal conduction in the dorsal column and spinothalamic tract, respectively. The reliable acquisition of CHEPs may depend on the intensity of the sensation reported by the subject for a given area of skin stimulated.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability of contact heat-evoked potentials (CHEPs) in neurologically healthy subjects from cervical dermatomes (C4-C8). Seventeen individuals underwent test-retest examination of cervical CHEPs. Peak latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude of N2-P2 and ratings of perceived intensity were analyzed using test-retest reliability statistics (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] and Bland-Altman confidence parameters). For comparison, a group of similar age and gender was also examined with dermatomal somatosensory-evoked potentials (dSSEPs, n = 17). The ICC values for CHEP latency and amplitude parameters were significant (P < 0.05) and corresponded to at least "fair" reliability, while peak-to-peak amplitude demonstrated "substantial" (≥0.81) reliability for all dermatomes. The coefficients of repeatability (i.e., 2SD of the difference between examinations) confirm that CHEPs and dSSEPs are reliable according to measures of latency. Superior peak-to-peak amplitude test-retest reliability was found for CHEPs. In conclusion, the test-retest reliability of dSSEP and CHEP parameters supports the fact that these outcomes can be used to objectively track changes in spinal conduction in the dorsal column and spinothalamic tract, respectively. The reliable acquisition of CHEPs may depend on the intensity of the sensation reported by the subject for a given area of skin stimulated.

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:19 Dec 2012 15:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:11
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0736-0258
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0b013e318246ada2
PubMed ID:22353989

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