UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Assessment of situational demands in a selection interview: reflective style or sensitivity?


Melchers, Klaus G; Bösser, Dieter; Hartstein, Thomas; Kleinmann, Martin (2012). Assessment of situational demands in a selection interview: reflective style or sensitivity? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 20(4):475-485.

Abstract

Correctly understanding situational demands is necessary to handle social situations appropriately. Past selection research has shown that candidates who are better at identifying the targeted dimensions in an interview or an assessment center, in fact, perform better in these procedures. However, at least two different processes might be responsible for the obtained findings. First, candidates might differ in their ability to correctly interpret given cues, meaning that some candidates generate better (i.e., more accurate) ideas than others. Second, some candidates might generally reflect more upon potential demands and therefore generate more ideas concerning potentially targeted dimensions. The present study used signal detection theory to investigate to what degree these two processes are related to interview performance. The interview was administered during a selection simulation for university graduates (N = 147). Interviewees' assumptions concerning the targeted dimensions were assessed in a postinterview questionnaire in which they had to write down any hypotheses as to what a certain question was trying to assess. We found that generating better ideas was essential for candidates' interview performance and not the degree to which they generally generated ideas about targeted interview dimension.

Abstract

Correctly understanding situational demands is necessary to handle social situations appropriately. Past selection research has shown that candidates who are better at identifying the targeted dimensions in an interview or an assessment center, in fact, perform better in these procedures. However, at least two different processes might be responsible for the obtained findings. First, candidates might differ in their ability to correctly interpret given cues, meaning that some candidates generate better (i.e., more accurate) ideas than others. Second, some candidates might generally reflect more upon potential demands and therefore generate more ideas concerning potentially targeted dimensions. The present study used signal detection theory to investigate to what degree these two processes are related to interview performance. The interview was administered during a selection simulation for university graduates (N = 147). Interviewees' assumptions concerning the targeted dimensions were assessed in a postinterview questionnaire in which they had to write down any hypotheses as to what a certain question was trying to assess. We found that generating better ideas was essential for candidates' interview performance and not the degree to which they generally generated ideas about targeted interview dimension.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Dec 2012 10:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Series Name:International Journal of Selection and Assessment
ISSN:0965-075X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12010

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations