UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of parenteral glutamine supplementation


Bollhalder, Lea; Pfeil, Alena M; Tomonaga, Yuki; Schwenkglenks, Matthias (2013). A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of parenteral glutamine supplementation. Clinical Nutrition, 32(2):213-223.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glutamine supplementation has been associated with reduced mortality, infections and hospital length of stay in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine randomized clinical trial (RCT)-based evidence of these effects. METHODS: Based on a systematic database search, RCTs published since 1990 were included if they evaluated the effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation against a background of parenteral nutrition. Enteral (tube) feeding in a proportion of patients was allowable. Information on RCT methodology, quality and outcomes was extracted. Random effects meta-analysis followed the DerSimonian-Laird approach. RESULTS: Forty RCTs were eligible for meta-analysis. Parenteral glutamine supplementation was associated with a non-significant 11% reduction in short-term mortality (RR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.77-1.04). Infections were significantly reduced (RR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95) and length of stay was 2.35 days shorter (95% CI, -3.68 to -1.02) in the glutamine arms. Meta-analysis results were strongly influenced by one recent trial. An element of publication bias could not be excluded. CONCLUSION: Parenteral glutamine supplementation in severely ill patients may reduce infections, length of stay and mortality, but substantial uncertainty remains. Unlike previous meta-analyses, we could not demonstrate a significant reduction in mortality.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Glutamine supplementation has been associated with reduced mortality, infections and hospital length of stay in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine randomized clinical trial (RCT)-based evidence of these effects. METHODS: Based on a systematic database search, RCTs published since 1990 were included if they evaluated the effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation against a background of parenteral nutrition. Enteral (tube) feeding in a proportion of patients was allowable. Information on RCT methodology, quality and outcomes was extracted. Random effects meta-analysis followed the DerSimonian-Laird approach. RESULTS: Forty RCTs were eligible for meta-analysis. Parenteral glutamine supplementation was associated with a non-significant 11% reduction in short-term mortality (RR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.77-1.04). Infections were significantly reduced (RR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95) and length of stay was 2.35 days shorter (95% CI, -3.68 to -1.02) in the glutamine arms. Meta-analysis results were strongly influenced by one recent trial. An element of publication bias could not be excluded. CONCLUSION: Parenteral glutamine supplementation in severely ill patients may reduce infections, length of stay and mortality, but substantial uncertainty remains. Unlike previous meta-analyses, we could not demonstrate a significant reduction in mortality.

Citations

50 citations in Web of Science®
70 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

125 downloads since deposited on 20 Dec 2012
24 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:20 Dec 2012 08:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0261-5614
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2012.11.003
PubMed ID:23196117

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 298kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations