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Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice


Frebel, Helge; Nindl, Veronika; Schuepbach, Reto A; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Richter, Kirsten; Vogel, Johannes; Wagner, Carsten A; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kurrer, Michael; Ludewig, Burkhard; Oxenius, Annette (2012). Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 209(13):2485-2499.

Abstract

The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1-PD-L1-mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1-deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1-PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell-mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell-mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections.

The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1-PD-L1-mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1-deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1-PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell-mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell-mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Intensive Care Medicine
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 Dec 2012 10:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:13
Publisher:Rockefeller University Press
ISSN:0022-1007
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20121015
PubMed ID:23230000
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-68934

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