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One IMU is sufficient: A study evaluating effects of dual-tasks on gait in elderly people


Adelsberger, Rolf; Theill, Nathan; Schumacher, Vera; Arnrich, Bert; Tröster, Gerhard (2012). One IMU is sufficient: A study evaluating effects of dual-tasks on gait in elderly people. In: MobiHealth, Paris, 21 November 2012 - 23 November 2012, -10.

Abstract

In industrialized countries the share of elderly subjects is in- creasing. Hence, diseases or symptoms associated with aging are more common than they were in the past. As a consequence, more effort is invested into research analyzing the effects of aging on the motion and cognition. However, economical and flexible methods to measure motion and its cross-effects with cognition are still missing. Therefore, we de- veloped a new approach which neither requires a specific location, large infrastructural requirements, nor does it require large investments. We base our setting on match-box sized inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the participants’ legs. 47 elderly subjects participated in our study where we analyzed the interplay between cognitive load and gait features. We show that it is feasible to automatically detect episodes of interest, e.g. straight path, during walking periods of a subject only using IMU data. Our approach detects the steps autonomously and cal- culates gait features without supervision. The results demonstrate that cognitive load induces a significant increase (p = 0.007) in step-duration variability from 16ms (baseline) to 21ms (load). Our findings demon- strate that IMUs are a proved alternative to static setups that usually require a non-trivial infrastructure, e.g. optical movement tracking.

In industrialized countries the share of elderly subjects is in- creasing. Hence, diseases or symptoms associated with aging are more common than they were in the past. As a consequence, more effort is invested into research analyzing the effects of aging on the motion and cognition. However, economical and flexible methods to measure motion and its cross-effects with cognition are still missing. Therefore, we de- veloped a new approach which neither requires a specific location, large infrastructural requirements, nor does it require large investments. We base our setting on match-box sized inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the participants’ legs. 47 elderly subjects participated in our study where we analyzed the interplay between cognitive load and gait features. We show that it is feasible to automatically detect episodes of interest, e.g. straight path, during walking periods of a subject only using IMU data. Our approach detects the steps autonomously and cal- culates gait features without supervision. The results demonstrate that cognitive load induces a significant increase (p = 0.007) in step-duration variability from 16ms (baseline) to 21ms (load). Our findings demon- strate that IMUs are a proved alternative to static setups that usually require a non-trivial infrastructure, e.g. optical movement tracking.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Event End Date:23 November 2012
Deposited On:17 Dec 2012 12:58
Last Modified:27 Apr 2016 12:13
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-68968

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