UZH-Logo

Treasure Hunt - a serious game to support psychotherapeutic treatment of children


Brezinka, V (2008). Treasure Hunt - a serious game to support psychotherapeutic treatment of children. In: Andersen, S K. eHealth beyond the horizon - get IT there. Amsterdam, NL: IOS Press, 71-76.

Abstract

Computer and video games for children have gained negative publicity due to reported associations between intensive gaming and aggressive behaviour, school failure, and overweight. While most studies centre upon negative consequences of video games, their innovative potentials tend to be overlooked. One field for the innovative use of computer games is child psychotherapy. By including therapeutic concepts into a video game, children can be offered attractive electronic homework assignments that enable them to rehearse and repeat basic psychoeducational concepts they have learned during therapy sessions. Moreover, therapeutic games can help therapists to structure therapy sessions. Psychotherapeutic computer games translated into foreign languages could form a useful tool in the treatment of migrant children. 'Treasure Hunt' is the first serious game based on principles of cognitive behaviour modification. It is developed for eight to twelve year old children who are in cognitive-behavioural treatment for various disorders. Reactions of children and therapists to experimental versions of the game are positive. Serious games might prove a useful tool to support psychotherapeutic treatment of children.

Computer and video games for children have gained negative publicity due to reported associations between intensive gaming and aggressive behaviour, school failure, and overweight. While most studies centre upon negative consequences of video games, their innovative potentials tend to be overlooked. One field for the innovative use of computer games is child psychotherapy. By including therapeutic concepts into a video game, children can be offered attractive electronic homework assignments that enable them to rehearse and repeat basic psychoeducational concepts they have learned during therapy sessions. Moreover, therapeutic games can help therapists to structure therapy sessions. Psychotherapeutic computer games translated into foreign languages could form a useful tool in the treatment of migrant children. 'Treasure Hunt' is the first serious game based on principles of cognitive behaviour modification. It is developed for eight to twelve year old children who are in cognitive-behavioural treatment for various disorders. Reactions of children and therapists to experimental versions of the game are positive. Serious games might prove a useful tool to support psychotherapeutic treatment of children.

Citations

18 citations in Web of Science®
26 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Downloads

56 downloads since deposited on 09 Jan 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:8 November 2008
Deposited On:09 Jan 2009 08:31
Last Modified:02 Aug 2016 07:46
Publisher:IOS Press
Series Name:Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Number:136
ISSN:0926-9630
ISBN:978-1-58603-864-9
Official URL:http://www.iospress.nl/html/9781586038649.php
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:default_scope:ebi01_prod007257770 (Library Catalogue)
(Publisher)
(Publisher)
PubMed ID:18487710
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6907

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations