UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The roads of decentralisation. The history of rural road construction in Ethiopia


Emmenegger, Rony (2012). The roads of decentralisation. The history of rural road construction in Ethiopia. NCCR North-South Dialogue, (39):53 S.

Abstract

Roads, in particular rural roads, play a major role in deve- lopment. In Ethiopia, where the vast majority of the popula- tion depends on agricultural production, this is even more so, and the country’s road network has become a major po- licy issue with significant consequences for the population. An extensive network of 114,397 km of different roads has been constructed, maintained, and classified to date. Alt- hough community roads account for nearly two-thirds of the country’s total road network, virtually no work deals specifically with issues related to their construction.
In an attempt to address this lack of information, this paper traces the history of the classified road network and of the governmental sector that has been in charge of its construc- tion, in order to shed light on current policies and practices. While regimes and policies have changed, roads have remai- ned important throughout the history of modern Ethiopia, and the road network has continuously grown, outliving its creators. Based on qualitative research methods, the paper provides useful insights about the role of rural roads in the country’s development policy, their relation to the process of decentralisation, and their construction at the local level. As such, the findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of state-led development in a decentralised setting, and shed light on the ways development policies collide with local realities.

Roads, in particular rural roads, play a major role in deve- lopment. In Ethiopia, where the vast majority of the popula- tion depends on agricultural production, this is even more so, and the country’s road network has become a major po- licy issue with significant consequences for the population. An extensive network of 114,397 km of different roads has been constructed, maintained, and classified to date. Alt- hough community roads account for nearly two-thirds of the country’s total road network, virtually no work deals specifically with issues related to their construction.
In an attempt to address this lack of information, this paper traces the history of the classified road network and of the governmental sector that has been in charge of its construc- tion, in order to shed light on current policies and practices. While regimes and policies have changed, roads have remai- ned important throughout the history of modern Ethiopia, and the road network has continuously grown, outliving its creators. Based on qualitative research methods, the paper provides useful insights about the role of rural roads in the country’s development policy, their relation to the process of decentralisation, and their construction at the local level. As such, the findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of state-led development in a decentralised setting, and shed light on the ways development policies collide with local realities.

Downloads

111 downloads since deposited on 18 Dec 2012
24 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:18 Dec 2012 16:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:13
Publisher:NCCR North-South. National Centre of Competence in Research
Official URL:http://www.north-south.unibe.ch/content.php/publication/id/2670
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-69095

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations