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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-6915

Johansen, P; Storni, T; Rettig, L; Qiu, Z; Der-Sarkissian, A; Smith, K A; Manolova, V; Lang, K S; Senti, G; Müllhaupt, B; Gerlach, T; Speck, R F; Bot, A M; Kündig, T M (2008). Antigen kinetics determines immune reactivity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 105(13):5189-5194.

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Abstract

A current paradigm in immunology is that the strength of T cell responses is governed by antigen dose, localization, and costimulatory signals. This study investigates the influence of antigen kinetics on CD8 T cell responses in mice. A fixed cumulative antigen dose was administered by different schedules to produce distinct dose-kinetics. Antigenic stimulation increasing exponentially over days was a stronger stimulus for CD8 T cells and antiviral immunity than a single dose or multiple dosing with daily equal doses. The same was observed for dendritic cell vaccination, with regard to T cell and anti-tumor responses, and for T cells stimulated in vitro. In conclusion, stimulation kinetics per se was shown to be a separate parameter of immunogenicity. These findings warrant a revision of current immunization models and have implications for vaccine development and immunotherapy.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Medical Research
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:01 April 2008
Deposited On:08 Dec 2008 12:46
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 23:37
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Additional Information:Copyright: National Academy of Sciences USA
Publisher DOI:10.1073/pnas.0706296105
PubMed ID:18362362
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 27
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