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Human T cell development and HIV infection in human hemato-lymphoid system mice


Baenziger, S; Ziegler, P; Mazzucchelli, L; Bronz, L; Speck, R F; Manz, M G (2008). Human T cell development and HIV infection in human hemato-lymphoid system mice. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, 324:125-131.

Abstract

Advances in generation of mice that on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation develop and maintain human hemato-lymphoid cells have fueled an already thriving field of research. We focus here on human T cell development and HIV infection in Rag2 -/- gamma(c) -/- mice transplanted as newborns with human CD34+ cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

Advances in generation of mice that on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation develop and maintain human hemato-lymphoid cells have fueled an already thriving field of research. We focus here on human T cell development and HIV infection in Rag2 -/- gamma(c) -/- mice transplanted as newborns with human CD34+ cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:08 Dec 2008 09:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:38
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0070-217X
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/978-3-540-75647-7_8
PubMed ID:18481457

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