UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Travel-associated sexually transmitted infections: an observational cross-sectional study of the GeoSentinel surveillance database


Matteelli, Alberto; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Carvalho, Anna Cc; Weld, Leisa; Davis, Xiaohong M; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Parola, Philippe; Pandey, Prativa; Han, Pauline; Castelli, Francesco (2013). Travel-associated sexually transmitted infections: an observational cross-sectional study of the GeoSentinel surveillance database. The Lancet infectious diseases, 13(3):205-213.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Travel is thought to be a risk factor for the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but no multicentre analyses have been done. We aimed to describe the range of diseases and the demographic and geographical factors associated with the acquisition of travel-related STIs through analysis of the data gathered by GeoSentinel travel medicine clinics worldwide.
METHODS: We gathered data from ill travellers visiting GeoSentinel clinics worldwide between June 1, 1996, and Nov 30, 2010, and analysed them to identify STIs in three clinical settings: after travel, during travel, or immigration travel. We calculated proportionate morbidity for each of the three traveller groups and did logistic regression to assess the association between STIs and demographic, geographical, and travel variables.
FINDINGS: Our final analysis was of 112 180 ill travellers-64 335 patients seen after travel, 38 287 patients seen during travel, and 9558 immigrant patients. 974 patients (0·9%) had diagnoses of STIs, and 1001 STIs were diagnosed. The proportionate STI morbidities were 6·6, 10·2, and 16·8 per 1000 travellers in the three groups, respectively. STIs varied substantially according to the traveller category. The most common STI diagnoses were non-gonococcal or unspecified urethritis (30·2%) and acute HIV infection (27·6%) in patients seen after travel; non-gonococcal or unspecified urethritis (21·1%), epididymitis (15·2%), and cervicitis (12·3%) in patients seen during travel; and syphilis in immigrant travellers (67·8%). In ill travellers seen after travel, significant associations were noted between diagnosis of STIs and male sex, travelling to visit friends or relatives, travel duration of less than 1 month, and not having pretravel health consultations.
INTERPRETATION: The range of STIs varies substantially according to traveller category. STI preventive strategies should be particularly targeted at men and travellers visiting friends or relatives. Our data suggest target groups for pretravel interventions and should assist in post-travel screening and decision making.
FUNDING: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and International Society of Travel Medicine.

BACKGROUND: Travel is thought to be a risk factor for the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but no multicentre analyses have been done. We aimed to describe the range of diseases and the demographic and geographical factors associated with the acquisition of travel-related STIs through analysis of the data gathered by GeoSentinel travel medicine clinics worldwide.
METHODS: We gathered data from ill travellers visiting GeoSentinel clinics worldwide between June 1, 1996, and Nov 30, 2010, and analysed them to identify STIs in three clinical settings: after travel, during travel, or immigration travel. We calculated proportionate morbidity for each of the three traveller groups and did logistic regression to assess the association between STIs and demographic, geographical, and travel variables.
FINDINGS: Our final analysis was of 112 180 ill travellers-64 335 patients seen after travel, 38 287 patients seen during travel, and 9558 immigrant patients. 974 patients (0·9%) had diagnoses of STIs, and 1001 STIs were diagnosed. The proportionate STI morbidities were 6·6, 10·2, and 16·8 per 1000 travellers in the three groups, respectively. STIs varied substantially according to the traveller category. The most common STI diagnoses were non-gonococcal or unspecified urethritis (30·2%) and acute HIV infection (27·6%) in patients seen after travel; non-gonococcal or unspecified urethritis (21·1%), epididymitis (15·2%), and cervicitis (12·3%) in patients seen during travel; and syphilis in immigrant travellers (67·8%). In ill travellers seen after travel, significant associations were noted between diagnosis of STIs and male sex, travelling to visit friends or relatives, travel duration of less than 1 month, and not having pretravel health consultations.
INTERPRETATION: The range of STIs varies substantially according to traveller category. STI preventive strategies should be particularly targeted at men and travellers visiting friends or relatives. Our data suggest target groups for pretravel interventions and should assist in post-travel screening and decision making.
FUNDING: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and International Society of Travel Medicine.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 14 Jan 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:14 Jan 2013 09:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:15
Publisher:The Lancet Publishing Group
ISSN:1473-3099
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(12)70291-8
PubMed ID:23182931
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-69519

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 233kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations