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Transplantation and tracking of human-induced pluripotent stem cells in a pig model of myocardial infarction: assessment of cell survival, engraftment, and distribution by hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of sodium iodide symporter transgene expression


Templin, Christian; Zweigerdt, Robert; Schwanke, Kristin; Olmer, Ruth; Ghadri, Jelena-Rima; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Müller, Ennio; Küest, Silke M; Cohrs, Susan; Schibli, Roger; Kronen, Peter W; Hilbe, Monika; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk; Haverich, Axel; Hoerstrup, Simon; Lüscher, Thomas F; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Landmesser, Ulf; Martin, Ulrich (2012). Transplantation and tracking of human-induced pluripotent stem cells in a pig model of myocardial infarction: assessment of cell survival, engraftment, and distribution by hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of sodium iodide symporter transgene expression. Circulation, 126(4):430-439.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evaluation of novel cellular therapies in large-animal models and patients is currently hampered by the lack of imaging approaches that allow for long-term monitoring of viable transplanted cells. In this study, sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transgene imaging was evaluated as an approach to follow in vivo survival, engraftment, and distribution of human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives in a pig model of myocardial infarction.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Transgenic hiPSC lines stably expressing a fluorescent reporter and NIS (NIS(pos)-hiPSCs) were established. Iodide uptake, efflux, and viability of NIS(pos)-hiPSCs were assessed in vitro. Ten (±2) days after induction of myocardial infarction by transient occlusion of the left anterior descending artery, catheter-based intramyocardial injection of NIS(pos)-hiPSCs guided by 3-dimensional NOGA mapping was performed. Dual-isotope single photon emission computed tomographic/computed tomographic imaging was applied with the use of (123)I to follow donor cell survival and distribution and with the use of (99m)TC-tetrofosmin for perfusion imaging. In vitro, iodide uptake in NIS(pos)-hiPSCs was increased 100-fold above that of nontransgenic controls. In vivo, viable NIS(pos)-hiPSCs could be visualized for up to 15 weeks. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that hiPSC-derived endothelial cells contributed to vascularization. Up to 12 to 15 weeks after transplantation, no teratomas were detected.

CONCLUSIONS: This study describes for the first time the feasibility of repeated long-term in vivo imaging of viability and tissue distribution of cellular grafts in large animals. Moreover, this is the first report demonstrating vascular differentiation and long-term engraftment of hiPSCs in a large-animal model of myocardial infarction. NIS(pos)-hiPSCs represent a valuable tool to monitor and improve current cellular treatment strategies in clinically relevant animal models.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evaluation of novel cellular therapies in large-animal models and patients is currently hampered by the lack of imaging approaches that allow for long-term monitoring of viable transplanted cells. In this study, sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transgene imaging was evaluated as an approach to follow in vivo survival, engraftment, and distribution of human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives in a pig model of myocardial infarction.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Transgenic hiPSC lines stably expressing a fluorescent reporter and NIS (NIS(pos)-hiPSCs) were established. Iodide uptake, efflux, and viability of NIS(pos)-hiPSCs were assessed in vitro. Ten (±2) days after induction of myocardial infarction by transient occlusion of the left anterior descending artery, catheter-based intramyocardial injection of NIS(pos)-hiPSCs guided by 3-dimensional NOGA mapping was performed. Dual-isotope single photon emission computed tomographic/computed tomographic imaging was applied with the use of (123)I to follow donor cell survival and distribution and with the use of (99m)TC-tetrofosmin for perfusion imaging. In vitro, iodide uptake in NIS(pos)-hiPSCs was increased 100-fold above that of nontransgenic controls. In vivo, viable NIS(pos)-hiPSCs could be visualized for up to 15 weeks. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that hiPSC-derived endothelial cells contributed to vascularization. Up to 12 to 15 weeks after transplantation, no teratomas were detected.

CONCLUSIONS: This study describes for the first time the feasibility of repeated long-term in vivo imaging of viability and tissue distribution of cellular grafts in large animals. Moreover, this is the first report demonstrating vascular differentiation and long-term engraftment of hiPSCs in a large-animal model of myocardial infarction. NIS(pos)-hiPSCs represent a valuable tool to monitor and improve current cellular treatment strategies in clinically relevant animal models.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Medical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:04 Feb 2013 09:19
Last Modified:17 May 2016 07:27
Publisher:American Heart Association
ISSN:0009-7322
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.087684
PubMed ID:22767659

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