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Hiding under the skin: Interleukin-17-producing γδ T cells go under the skin?


Becher, Burkhard; Pantelyushin, Stanislav (2012). Hiding under the skin: Interleukin-17-producing γδ T cells go under the skin? Nature Medicine, 18(12):1748-1750.

Abstract

Despite the irrefutable role of inflammation in psoriasis, a complete knowledge of what immune cells and cytokines are involved during initiation and progression of this skin disease is lacking. Moreover, the complexities of the immune cell network and potential differences between mice and humans have led to translational failures. It is therefore important that we acquire in-depth understanding of what inflammatory players, of the many involved, are crucial, if we wish to develop effective therapies. In 'Bedside to Bench', James Krueger discusses how a subset of T cells, TH17 cells, which release interleukin-17 in humans, seem to be essential for pathogenesis of psoriasis. The interplay between interleukin-17 and other cytokines that may potentially be involved in psoriasis also needs further investigation. Additionally, there are open questions as to what subset of T cells, other than TH17, also produce interleukin-17 and when. In 'Bench to Bedside', Burkhard Becher and Stanislav Pantelyushin examine this issue by looking at a mouse model of skin inflammation that resembles psoriasis in humans. A class of skin-invading innate immune cells called γδ T cells was shown to drive skin inflammation in this model, particularly during the early stages of the disease, suggesting that innate immunity plays an important part in the initiation of psoriasis.

Abstract

Despite the irrefutable role of inflammation in psoriasis, a complete knowledge of what immune cells and cytokines are involved during initiation and progression of this skin disease is lacking. Moreover, the complexities of the immune cell network and potential differences between mice and humans have led to translational failures. It is therefore important that we acquire in-depth understanding of what inflammatory players, of the many involved, are crucial, if we wish to develop effective therapies. In 'Bedside to Bench', James Krueger discusses how a subset of T cells, TH17 cells, which release interleukin-17 in humans, seem to be essential for pathogenesis of psoriasis. The interplay between interleukin-17 and other cytokines that may potentially be involved in psoriasis also needs further investigation. Additionally, there are open questions as to what subset of T cells, other than TH17, also produce interleukin-17 and when. In 'Bench to Bedside', Burkhard Becher and Stanislav Pantelyushin examine this issue by looking at a mouse model of skin inflammation that resembles psoriasis in humans. A class of skin-invading innate immune cells called γδ T cells was shown to drive skin inflammation in this model, particularly during the early stages of the disease, suggesting that innate immunity plays an important part in the initiation of psoriasis.

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24 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:17 Jan 2013 13:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:17
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1078-8956
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.3016
PubMed ID:23223063

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