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Communication between pathogenic T cells and myeloid cells in neuroinflammatory disease


Codarri, Laura; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard (2013). Communication between pathogenic T cells and myeloid cells in neuroinflammatory disease. Trends in Immunology, 34(3):114-119.

Abstract

Clinical and experimental data suggest that T helper (T(H)) cells are involved in the pathogenicity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is unlikely that they are directly responsible for the observed demyelination and axonal loss. Instead, the cell population that targets the destruction of oligodendrocytes and axons, and the mechanism exploited by central nervous system (CNS)-invading encephalitogenic T(H) cells to instruct these cells to mediate tissue damage, are still under debate. Mature myeloid cells form a prominent component of the neuroinflammatory infiltrates and are the suspected culprits behind the CNS injury due to their arsenal of toxic factors. Here, we describe the process of encephalitogenic T(H) cell activation followed by their entry into the CNS and discuss how pathogenic T(H) cells influence the myeloid compartment.

Clinical and experimental data suggest that T helper (T(H)) cells are involved in the pathogenicity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is unlikely that they are directly responsible for the observed demyelination and axonal loss. Instead, the cell population that targets the destruction of oligodendrocytes and axons, and the mechanism exploited by central nervous system (CNS)-invading encephalitogenic T(H) cells to instruct these cells to mediate tissue damage, are still under debate. Mature myeloid cells form a prominent component of the neuroinflammatory infiltrates and are the suspected culprits behind the CNS injury due to their arsenal of toxic factors. Here, we describe the process of encephalitogenic T(H) cell activation followed by their entry into the CNS and discuss how pathogenic T(H) cells influence the myeloid compartment.

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22 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Jan 2013 13:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:17
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1471-4906
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.it.2012.09.007
PubMed ID:23116549

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