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IL-23: one cytokine in control of autoimmunity


Croxford, Andrew L; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard (2012). IL-23: one cytokine in control of autoimmunity. European Journal of Immunology, 42(9):2263-2273.

Abstract

During the past decade, it has been firmly established that IL-23 is essential for disease development in several models of autoimmune disease, including psoriatic skin inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The mechanism by which IL-23 exerts its pathogenic role has been mostly scrutinized in the context of Th17 cells, which were thought to mediate autoimmunity by secretion of IL-17 family cytokines. However, the picture emerging now is one of multiple IL-23-responsive cell types, pro-inflammatory cytokine induction, and pathogenic "licensing" following an IL-23-dominated interaction between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell (APC). This review will focus on our changing view of IL-23-dependent autoimmune pathologies with a particular emphasis on the responder cells and their IL-23-induced factors that ultimately mediate tissue destruction.

Abstract

During the past decade, it has been firmly established that IL-23 is essential for disease development in several models of autoimmune disease, including psoriatic skin inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The mechanism by which IL-23 exerts its pathogenic role has been mostly scrutinized in the context of Th17 cells, which were thought to mediate autoimmunity by secretion of IL-17 family cytokines. However, the picture emerging now is one of multiple IL-23-responsive cell types, pro-inflammatory cytokine induction, and pathogenic "licensing" following an IL-23-dominated interaction between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell (APC). This review will focus on our changing view of IL-23-dependent autoimmune pathologies with a particular emphasis on the responder cells and their IL-23-induced factors that ultimately mediate tissue destruction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:17 Jan 2013 13:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:17
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag Berlin
ISSN:0014-2980
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/eji.201242598
PubMed ID:22949325

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