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The collapse of protoplanetary clumps formed through disc instability: 3D simulations of the pre-dissociation phase


Galvagni, M; Hayfield, T; Boley, A; Mayer, L; Roškar, R; Saha, P (2012). The collapse of protoplanetary clumps formed through disc instability: 3D simulations of the pre-dissociation phase. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 427(2):1725-1740.

Abstract

We present 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of clumps formed through gravitational instability in the outer part of a protoplanetary disc. The initial conditions are taken directly from a global disc simulation, and a realistic equation of state is used to follow the clumps as they contract over several orders of magnitude in density, approaching the molecular hydrogen dissociation stage. The effects of clump rotation, asymmetries and radiative cooling are studied. Rotation provides support against fast collapse, but non-axisymmetric modes develop and efficiently transport angular momentum outwards, forming a circumplanetary disc. This transport helps the clump reach the dynamical collapse phase, resulting from molecular hydrogen dissociation, on a thousand-year time-scale, which is smaller than time-scales predicted by some previous spherical 1D collapse models. Extrapolation to the threshold of the runaway hydrogen dissociation indicates that the collapse time-scales can be shorter than inward migration time-scales, suggesting that clumps could survive tidal disruption and deliver a protogas giant to distances of even a few au from the central star.

We present 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of clumps formed through gravitational instability in the outer part of a protoplanetary disc. The initial conditions are taken directly from a global disc simulation, and a realistic equation of state is used to follow the clumps as they contract over several orders of magnitude in density, approaching the molecular hydrogen dissociation stage. The effects of clump rotation, asymmetries and radiative cooling are studied. Rotation provides support against fast collapse, but non-axisymmetric modes develop and efficiently transport angular momentum outwards, forming a circumplanetary disc. This transport helps the clump reach the dynamical collapse phase, resulting from molecular hydrogen dissociation, on a thousand-year time-scale, which is smaller than time-scales predicted by some previous spherical 1D collapse models. Extrapolation to the threshold of the runaway hydrogen dissociation indicates that the collapse time-scales can be shorter than inward migration time-scales, suggesting that clumps could survive tidal disruption and deliver a protogas giant to distances of even a few au from the central star.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 07:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:18
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0035-8711
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.22096.x
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-70251

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