UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Electrophysiology in child psychiatric disorders


Banaschewski, T; Brandeis, D (2008). Electrophysiology in child psychiatric disorders. In: Banaschewski, T; Rohde, L A. Biological child psychiatry. Basel, CH: Karger, 227-237.

Abstract

Human brain activity reflects the wide time range of neural events. Measuring the brain’s electric (EEG/ERP) and magnetic (MEG) fields resolves both fast and slow neural events through completely noninvasive recordings. EEG/ERP measures the dynamics of neural activations from milliseconds to hours for a wide variety of brain states and processes, even during sleep and in infants. Mapping and source estimation localizes these dynamic activation patterns in the brain with increasing accuracy. How recent EEG/ERP research on brain function has substantially contributed to the understanding of normal development and psychiatric conditions of children and adolescents is illustrated. The high time resolution is particularly important for measuring covert processes and distinguishing cause and effect in studies of perception, attention and executive control, memory, language, and emotion. The selected clinical applications in children and adolescents covers attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder along with its main comorbid disorders, specific language disorders and dyslexia. Future applications of EEG/ERP markers may clarify the interactions between brain states and transient functions, distinguish etiological pathways through patterns of genetic modulation, and predict clinical treatment response.

Abstract

Human brain activity reflects the wide time range of neural events. Measuring the brain’s electric (EEG/ERP) and magnetic (MEG) fields resolves both fast and slow neural events through completely noninvasive recordings. EEG/ERP measures the dynamics of neural activations from milliseconds to hours for a wide variety of brain states and processes, even during sleep and in infants. Mapping and source estimation localizes these dynamic activation patterns in the brain with increasing accuracy. How recent EEG/ERP research on brain function has substantially contributed to the understanding of normal development and psychiatric conditions of children and adolescents is illustrated. The high time resolution is particularly important for measuring covert processes and distinguishing cause and effect in studies of perception, attention and executive control, memory, language, and emotion. The selected clinical applications in children and adolescents covers attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder along with its main comorbid disorders, specific language disorders and dyslexia. Future applications of EEG/ERP markers may clarify the interactions between brain states and transient functions, distinguish etiological pathways through patterns of genetic modulation, and predict clinical treatment response.

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:19 Dec 2008 12:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:39
Publisher:Karger
Series Name:Advances in biological psychiatry
Number:24
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000118527
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005539497

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations