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Psychosocial profiles after transplantation: a 24-month follow-up of heart, lung, liver, kidney and allogeneic bone-marrow patients


Goetzmann, L; Ruegg, L; Stamm, M; Ambühl, P; Boehler, A; Halter, J; Muellhaupt, B; Noll, G; Schanz, U; Wagner-Huber, R; Spindler, A; Buddeberg, C; Klaghofer, R (2008). Psychosocial profiles after transplantation: a 24-month follow-up of heart, lung, liver, kidney and allogeneic bone-marrow patients. Transplantation, 86(5):662-668.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Quality of life and psychosocial well-being usually improve after an organ transplant and remain stable for a minimum of several years. These findings, however, mainly apply to the "average" trend for transplant patients. This study aims to investigate whether transplant patients fall into different groups in good or poor psychosocial outcome after organ transplantation. METHODS: One hundred thirty-one patients were assessed before and 6, 12, and 24 months after a heart, lung, liver, kidney, or bone-marrow transplant. Cluster analysis was applied to identify typical outcome profiles of the patients' mental health (SF-36); differences between the clusters were investigated with regard to further psychosocial parameters (sense of coherence, optimism, psychosocial functioning, anxiety, depression, life/health satisfaction, medication experience). RESULTS: The analysis revealed two clusters of transplant patients. Cluster A (n=78, 59.5%) showed a fairly good psychosocial outcome, improving over the posttransplant period of 2 years. Cluster B (n=53, 40.5%) included patients who reported a limited or poor outcome, deteriorating after the transplant. Furthermore, there are significant differences between clusters A and B in psychosocial parameters and physical functioning. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that the experience of the transplant process may vary greatly from patient to patient, and that a considerable number of transplant recipients require psychosocial support, despite the majority of patients showing an unquestionable posttransplant improvement in psychosocial well-being.

OBJECTIVES: Quality of life and psychosocial well-being usually improve after an organ transplant and remain stable for a minimum of several years. These findings, however, mainly apply to the "average" trend for transplant patients. This study aims to investigate whether transplant patients fall into different groups in good or poor psychosocial outcome after organ transplantation. METHODS: One hundred thirty-one patients were assessed before and 6, 12, and 24 months after a heart, lung, liver, kidney, or bone-marrow transplant. Cluster analysis was applied to identify typical outcome profiles of the patients' mental health (SF-36); differences between the clusters were investigated with regard to further psychosocial parameters (sense of coherence, optimism, psychosocial functioning, anxiety, depression, life/health satisfaction, medication experience). RESULTS: The analysis revealed two clusters of transplant patients. Cluster A (n=78, 59.5%) showed a fairly good psychosocial outcome, improving over the posttransplant period of 2 years. Cluster B (n=53, 40.5%) included patients who reported a limited or poor outcome, deteriorating after the transplant. Furthermore, there are significant differences between clusters A and B in psychosocial parameters and physical functioning. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that the experience of the transplant process may vary greatly from patient to patient, and that a considerable number of transplant recipients require psychosocial support, despite the majority of patients showing an unquestionable posttransplant improvement in psychosocial well-being.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Psychosocial Medicine (former)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:15 September 2008
Deposited On:08 Dec 2008 18:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:39
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0041-1337
Publisher DOI:10.1097/TP.0b013e3181817dd7
PubMed ID:18791447
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-7062

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