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Evaluation of sensor sites for continuous glucose monitoring in cats with diabetes mellitus


Hafner, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Zini, E (2013). Evaluation of sensor sites for continuous glucose monitoring in cats with diabetes mellitus. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 15(2):117-123.

Abstract

The continuous glucose monitoring system allows generation of detailed glucose curves via measurement of glucose concentration in interstitial fluid. The conventional site for sensor placement in diabetic cats is the subcutaneous tissue of the lateral chest wall. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of sensors placed in the lateral chest wall and in two alternative sites - the dorsal neck and lateral knee fold - of diabetic cats. Initialisation was successful in 15/20 lateral chest wall sensors, 9/10 neck sensors and 3/10 knee fold sensors. Compared with the reference portable blood glucose meter, 0.8% of measurements from lateral chest wall sensors, 0.7% from knee fold sensors and 0% from neck sensors would have resulted in erroneous treatment. This preliminary study suggests that dorsal neck placement may be superior to lateral chest wall and lateral knee fold; however, further investigation with a larger number of cases would be required to confirm this finding.

The continuous glucose monitoring system allows generation of detailed glucose curves via measurement of glucose concentration in interstitial fluid. The conventional site for sensor placement in diabetic cats is the subcutaneous tissue of the lateral chest wall. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of sensors placed in the lateral chest wall and in two alternative sites - the dorsal neck and lateral knee fold - of diabetic cats. Initialisation was successful in 15/20 lateral chest wall sensors, 9/10 neck sensors and 3/10 knee fold sensors. Compared with the reference portable blood glucose meter, 0.8% of measurements from lateral chest wall sensors, 0.7% from knee fold sensors and 0% from neck sensors would have resulted in erroneous treatment. This preliminary study suggests that dorsal neck placement may be superior to lateral chest wall and lateral knee fold; however, further investigation with a larger number of cases would be required to confirm this finding.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:28 Jan 2013 12:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:19
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X12463925
PubMed ID:23064996
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-70634

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