UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Variation in individual job opportunities


Kriesi, I; Buchmann, M; Sacchi, S (2008). Variation in individual job opportunities. In: Social stratification and insiders/outsiders: cross-national comparisons within and between continents, Florence, Italy, 15 May 2008 - 17 May 2008.

Abstract

Our paper examines variation in individual job opportunities of Swiss men and women of two birth cohorts and the factors accounting for this variation. Differences in job opportunities and the structure of these have seldom been a topic of empirical research, mostly due to difficult and complex measurement issues. This paper contributes to this open field of research, first, by applying a measure for time-dependent individual job opportunities and, second, by analysing the extent to which individual job opportunities depend on supply- and demand-side factors.
The analyses are based on two data sets. The Swiss Job Monitor provides annual occupation-level information on the number of advertised jobs, helping us to construct indicators for individual job opportunities and the overall labor demand. The Swiss Life History Study provides monthly individual-level information on occupational careers of two birth cohorts. We link the two data sets, transform the data into person-years and apply linear regression analysis. The results show that similar factors determine individual job opportunities of men and women. They depend on the overall economic situation, the occupational growth rate as well as on age, human capital, and occupational credentials. However, the respective weight of these factors differs for men and women. Demand-side factors play a more important role for men’s job opportunities. Supply-side factors – and occupational credentials in particular – seem to be more important for women.

Our paper examines variation in individual job opportunities of Swiss men and women of two birth cohorts and the factors accounting for this variation. Differences in job opportunities and the structure of these have seldom been a topic of empirical research, mostly due to difficult and complex measurement issues. This paper contributes to this open field of research, first, by applying a measure for time-dependent individual job opportunities and, second, by analysing the extent to which individual job opportunities depend on supply- and demand-side factors.
The analyses are based on two data sets. The Swiss Job Monitor provides annual occupation-level information on the number of advertised jobs, helping us to construct indicators for individual job opportunities and the overall labor demand. The Swiss Life History Study provides monthly individual-level information on occupational careers of two birth cohorts. We link the two data sets, transform the data into person-years and apply linear regression analysis. The results show that similar factors determine individual job opportunities of men and women. They depend on the overall economic situation, the occupational growth rate as well as on age, human capital, and occupational credentials. However, the respective weight of these factors differs for men and women. Demand-side factors play a more important role for men’s job opportunities. Supply-side factors – and occupational credentials in particular – seem to be more important for women.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Event End Date:17 May 2008
Deposited On:08 Dec 2008 13:32
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:39
Additional Information:Paper presented at the spring meeting of the ISA Research Committee 28 on social stratification and mobility
Official URL:http://www.eui.eu/RSCAS/Events/RC28/programme.shtml

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations