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Quantification of brain glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG PET with real-time arterial and image-derived input function in mice


Alf, Malte F; Wyss, Matthias T; Buck, Alfred; Weber, Bruno; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D (2013). Quantification of brain glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG PET with real-time arterial and image-derived input function in mice. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 54(1):132-138.

Abstract

Kinetic modeling of PET data derived from mouse models remains hampered by the technical inaccessibility of an accurate input function (IF). In this work, we tested the feasibility of IF measurement with an arteriovenous shunt and a coincidence counter in mice and compared the method with an image-derived IF (IDIF) obtained by ensemble-learning independent component analysis of the heart region.
METHODS:
(18)F-FDG brain kinetics were quantified in 2 mouse strains, CD1 and C57BL/6, using the standard 2-tissue-compartment model. Fits obtained with the 2 IFs were compared regarding their goodness of fit as assessed by the residuals, fit parameter SD, and Bland-Altman analysis.
RESULTS:
On average, cerebral glucose metabolic rate was 10% higher for IDIF-based quantification. The precision of model parameter fitting was significantly higher using the shunt-based IF, rendering the quantification of single process rate constants feasible.
CONCLUSION:
We demonstrated that the arterial IF can be measured in mice with a femoral arteriovenous shunt. This technique resulted in higher precision for kinetic modeling parameters than did use of the IDIF. However, for longitudinal or high-throughput studies, the use of a minimally invasive IDIF based on ensemble-learning independent component analysis represents a suitable alternative.

Abstract

Kinetic modeling of PET data derived from mouse models remains hampered by the technical inaccessibility of an accurate input function (IF). In this work, we tested the feasibility of IF measurement with an arteriovenous shunt and a coincidence counter in mice and compared the method with an image-derived IF (IDIF) obtained by ensemble-learning independent component analysis of the heart region.
METHODS:
(18)F-FDG brain kinetics were quantified in 2 mouse strains, CD1 and C57BL/6, using the standard 2-tissue-compartment model. Fits obtained with the 2 IFs were compared regarding their goodness of fit as assessed by the residuals, fit parameter SD, and Bland-Altman analysis.
RESULTS:
On average, cerebral glucose metabolic rate was 10% higher for IDIF-based quantification. The precision of model parameter fitting was significantly higher using the shunt-based IF, rendering the quantification of single process rate constants feasible.
CONCLUSION:
We demonstrated that the arterial IF can be measured in mice with a femoral arteriovenous shunt. This technique resulted in higher precision for kinetic modeling parameters than did use of the IDIF. However, for longitudinal or high-throughput studies, the use of a minimally invasive IDIF based on ensemble-learning independent component analysis represents a suitable alternative.

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:11 Mar 2013 17:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:22
Publisher:Society of Nuclear Medicine
ISSN:0161-5505
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2967/jnumed.112.107474
PubMed ID:23160788

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