UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Urinary leukotriene E4 concentrations as a potential marker of inflammation in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease


Im Hof, M; Schnyder, M; Hartnack, S; Stanke-Labesque, F; Luckschander, N; Burgener, I A (2012). Urinary leukotriene E4 concentrations as a potential marker of inflammation in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 26(2):269-274.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and food-responsive diarrhea (FRD) are chronic enteropathies of dogs (CCE) that currently can only be differentiated by their response to treatment after exclusion of other diseases. In humans, increased urinary concentrations of leukotriene E4 (LTE4) have been associated with active IBD.
OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate urinary LTE4 concentrations in dogs with IBD, FRD, and healthy controls, and to assess correlation of urinary LTE4 concentrations with the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI) scores.
ANIMALS:
Eighteen dogs with IBD, 19 dogs with FRD, and 23 healthy control dogs.
METHODS:
In this prospective study, urine was collected and CIBDAI scores were calculated in client-owned dogs with IBD and those with FRD. Quantification of LTE4 in urine was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and corrected to creatinine.
RESULTS:
Urinary LTE4 concentrations were highest in dogs with IBD (median 85.2 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 10.9-372.6]) followed by those with FRD (median 31.2 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 6.2-114.5]) and control dogs (median 21.1 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 9.1-86.5]). Urinary LTE4 concentrations were higher in dogs with IBD than in control dogs (P = .011), but no significant difference between IBD and FRD was found. No correlation was found between urinary LTE4 concentrations and CIBDAI.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:
The higher urinary LTE4 concentrations in dogs with IBD suggest that cysteinyl leukotriene pathway activation might be a component of the inflammatory process in canine IBD. Furthermore, urinary LTE4 concentrations are of potential use as a marker of inflammation in dogs with CCE.

BACKGROUND:
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and food-responsive diarrhea (FRD) are chronic enteropathies of dogs (CCE) that currently can only be differentiated by their response to treatment after exclusion of other diseases. In humans, increased urinary concentrations of leukotriene E4 (LTE4) have been associated with active IBD.
OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate urinary LTE4 concentrations in dogs with IBD, FRD, and healthy controls, and to assess correlation of urinary LTE4 concentrations with the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI) scores.
ANIMALS:
Eighteen dogs with IBD, 19 dogs with FRD, and 23 healthy control dogs.
METHODS:
In this prospective study, urine was collected and CIBDAI scores were calculated in client-owned dogs with IBD and those with FRD. Quantification of LTE4 in urine was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and corrected to creatinine.
RESULTS:
Urinary LTE4 concentrations were highest in dogs with IBD (median 85.2 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 10.9-372.6]) followed by those with FRD (median 31.2 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 6.2-114.5]) and control dogs (median 21.1 pg/mg creatinine [10th-90th percentiles 9.1-86.5]). Urinary LTE4 concentrations were higher in dogs with IBD than in control dogs (P = .011), but no significant difference between IBD and FRD was found. No correlation was found between urinary LTE4 concentrations and CIBDAI.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:
The higher urinary LTE4 concentrations in dogs with IBD suggest that cysteinyl leukotriene pathway activation might be a component of the inflammatory process in canine IBD. Furthermore, urinary LTE4 concentrations are of potential use as a marker of inflammation in dogs with CCE.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 04 Feb 2013
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:04 Feb 2013 12:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0891-6640
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2011.00867.x
PubMed ID:22268894
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-71403

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 171kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations