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Hemiclone diversity in the hybridogenetic frog Rana esculenta outside the area of clone formation: the view from protein electrophoresis.


Hotz, H; Guex, G D; Beerli, P; Semlitsch, R D; Pruvost, N B M (2008). Hemiclone diversity in the hybridogenetic frog Rana esculenta outside the area of clone formation: the view from protein electrophoresis. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, 46(1):56-62.

Abstract

European water frog hybrids Rana esculenta reproduce hemiclonally, by hybridogenesis: In the germ line they exclude the genome of the parental
species Rana lessonae and produce haploid, unrecombined gametes with a genome of the parental species Rana ridibunda. These hybrids coexist
with and depend as sexual parasites on the host parental species R. lessonae (the L-E population system); matings with R. lessonae restore somatic
hybridity in each generation of R. esculenta. We investigated 15 L-E system populations in northern Switzerland, which is outside R. ridibunda
native range. Frequency of hybrids in samples varied from 8% in marsh ponds to 100% in gravel pits and forest ponds. Clonal diversity (variation
among R. ridibunda genomes of hybrids), detected by six protein electrophoretic marker loci, revealed a total of eight hemiclones and locally
ranged from uniclonal populations in southern parts of the survey region to six coexisting hemiclones in the north. All alleles distinguishing
hemiclones occur commonly in the nearest native R. ridibunda populations of east-central Europe; the most probable source of clonal diversity in
our samples is multiple clone formation by primary hybridizations in the sympatry area of R. ridibunda and R. lessonae and subsequent dispersal
of hemiclonal lineages. A positive correlation between amount of clonal diversity and hybrid frequency, predicted by the Frozen Niche Variation
(FNV) model (each hemiclone is characterized by a relatively narrow niche, coexistence is possible through niche partitioning), was not found;
this contrasts with hemiclonally reproducing fish hybrids (Poeciliopsis). Historical factors, such as availability of different colonizing hemiclones
may be strong enough to override the signal from operation of the FNV.

European water frog hybrids Rana esculenta reproduce hemiclonally, by hybridogenesis: In the germ line they exclude the genome of the parental
species Rana lessonae and produce haploid, unrecombined gametes with a genome of the parental species Rana ridibunda. These hybrids coexist
with and depend as sexual parasites on the host parental species R. lessonae (the L-E population system); matings with R. lessonae restore somatic
hybridity in each generation of R. esculenta. We investigated 15 L-E system populations in northern Switzerland, which is outside R. ridibunda
native range. Frequency of hybrids in samples varied from 8% in marsh ponds to 100% in gravel pits and forest ponds. Clonal diversity (variation
among R. ridibunda genomes of hybrids), detected by six protein electrophoretic marker loci, revealed a total of eight hemiclones and locally
ranged from uniclonal populations in southern parts of the survey region to six coexisting hemiclones in the north. All alleles distinguishing
hemiclones occur commonly in the nearest native R. ridibunda populations of east-central Europe; the most probable source of clonal diversity in
our samples is multiple clone formation by primary hybridizations in the sympatry area of R. ridibunda and R. lessonae and subsequent dispersal
of hemiclonal lineages. A positive correlation between amount of clonal diversity and hybrid frequency, predicted by the Frozen Niche Variation
(FNV) model (each hemiclone is characterized by a relatively narrow niche, coexistence is possible through niche partitioning), was not found;
this contrasts with hemiclonally reproducing fish hybrids (Poeciliopsis). Historical factors, such as availability of different colonizing hemiclones
may be strong enough to override the signal from operation of the FNV.

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Allozymes, clonal coexistence, clonal reproduction, Frozen Niche Variation, genetic diversity, hybridogenesis, Rana esculenta complex
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0947-5745
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0469.2007.00430.x

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