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Minimal acute rejection in pediatric lung transplantation - does it matter?


Benden, Christian; Faro, Albert; Worley, Sarah; Arrigain, Susana; Aurora, Paul; Ballmann, Manfred; Boyer, Debra; Conrad, Carol; Eichler, Irmgard; Elidemir, Okan; Goldfarb, Samuel; Mallory, George B; Mogayzel, Peter J; Parakininkas, Daiva; Solomon, Melinda; Visner, Gary; Sweet, Stuart C; Danziger-Isakov, Lara A (2010). Minimal acute rejection in pediatric lung transplantation - does it matter? Pediatric Transplantation, 14(4):534-539.

Abstract

In adult lung transplantation, a single minimal AR episode is a significant predictor of BOS independent of other factors. However, the significance of single minimal AR episodes in children is unknown. A retrospective, multi-center analysis was performed to determine whether isolated single AR episodes are associated with an increased BOS risk in children. Risk factors for BOS, death, or re-transplantation, and a combined outcome of BOS, death, or re-transplantation were assessed. Original data included 577 patients (<21 yr of age). A total of 383 subjects were eligible for the study. Fifteen percent of patients developed BOS, and 13% of patients either died or underwent re-transplant within one-yr post-transplant. In the multivariable survival model for time to BOS, there was no significant risk to developing BOS after a single minimal AR (A1) episode (HR 1.7, 95% CI 0.64-4.8; p=0.28). Even after a second minimal AR episode, no significant risk for BOS was appreciated. However, a single episode of mild AR (A2) was associated with twice the risk of BOS within one-yr post-transplant. In this select cohort, a single minimal AR episode was not associated with an increased risk for BOS within one yr following lung transplantation, in contrast to previous reports in adults.

In adult lung transplantation, a single minimal AR episode is a significant predictor of BOS independent of other factors. However, the significance of single minimal AR episodes in children is unknown. A retrospective, multi-center analysis was performed to determine whether isolated single AR episodes are associated with an increased BOS risk in children. Risk factors for BOS, death, or re-transplantation, and a combined outcome of BOS, death, or re-transplantation were assessed. Original data included 577 patients (<21 yr of age). A total of 383 subjects were eligible for the study. Fifteen percent of patients developed BOS, and 13% of patients either died or underwent re-transplant within one-yr post-transplant. In the multivariable survival model for time to BOS, there was no significant risk to developing BOS after a single minimal AR (A1) episode (HR 1.7, 95% CI 0.64-4.8; p=0.28). Even after a second minimal AR episode, no significant risk for BOS was appreciated. However, a single episode of mild AR (A2) was associated with twice the risk of BOS within one-yr post-transplant. In this select cohort, a single minimal AR episode was not associated with an increased risk for BOS within one yr following lung transplantation, in contrast to previous reports in adults.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:16 Apr 2013 10:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:24
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1397-3142
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3046.2009.01268.x
PubMed ID:20059725

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