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Pendrin in the mouse kidney is primarily regulated by Cl- excretion but also by systemic metabolic acidosis


Hafner, P; Grimaldi, R; Capuano, P; Capasso, G; Wagner, C A (2008). Pendrin in the mouse kidney is primarily regulated by Cl- excretion but also by systemic metabolic acidosis. American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology, 295(6):C1658-C1667.

Abstract

The Cl(-)/anion exchanger pendrin (SLC26A4) is expressed on the apical side of renal non-type A intercalated cells. The abundance of pendrin is reduced during metabolic acidosis induced by oral NH(4)Cl loading. More recently, it has been shown that pendrin expression is increased during conditions associated with decreased urinary Cl(-) excretion and decreased upon Cl(-) loading. Hence, it is unclear if pendrin regulation during NH(4)Cl-induced acidosis is primarily due the Cl(-) load or acidosis. Therefore, we treated mice to increase urinary acidification, induce metabolic acidosis, or provide an oral Cl(-) load and examined the systemic acid-base status, urinary acidification, urinary Cl(-) excretion, and pendrin abundance in the kidney. NaCl or NH(4)Cl increased urinary Cl(-) excretion, whereas (NH(4))(2)SO(4), Na(2)SO(4), and acetazolamide treatments decreased urinary Cl(-) excretion. NH(4)Cl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and acetazolamide caused metabolic acidosis and stimulated urinary net acid excretion. Pendrin expression was reduced under NaCl, NH(4)Cl, and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) loading and increased with the other treatments. (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and acetazolamide treatments reduced the relative number of pendrin-expressing cells in the collecting duct. In a second series, animals were kept for 1 and 2 wk on a low-protein (20%) diet or a high-protein (50%) diet. The high-protein diet slightly increased urinary Cl(-) excretion and strongly stimulated net acid excretion but did not alter pendrin expression. Thus, pendrin expression is primarily correlated with urinary Cl(-) excretion but not blood Cl(-). However, metabolic acidosis caused by acetazolamide or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) loading prevented the increase or even reduced pendrin expression despite low urinary Cl(-) excretion, suggesting an independent regulation by acid-base status.

The Cl(-)/anion exchanger pendrin (SLC26A4) is expressed on the apical side of renal non-type A intercalated cells. The abundance of pendrin is reduced during metabolic acidosis induced by oral NH(4)Cl loading. More recently, it has been shown that pendrin expression is increased during conditions associated with decreased urinary Cl(-) excretion and decreased upon Cl(-) loading. Hence, it is unclear if pendrin regulation during NH(4)Cl-induced acidosis is primarily due the Cl(-) load or acidosis. Therefore, we treated mice to increase urinary acidification, induce metabolic acidosis, or provide an oral Cl(-) load and examined the systemic acid-base status, urinary acidification, urinary Cl(-) excretion, and pendrin abundance in the kidney. NaCl or NH(4)Cl increased urinary Cl(-) excretion, whereas (NH(4))(2)SO(4), Na(2)SO(4), and acetazolamide treatments decreased urinary Cl(-) excretion. NH(4)Cl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and acetazolamide caused metabolic acidosis and stimulated urinary net acid excretion. Pendrin expression was reduced under NaCl, NH(4)Cl, and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) loading and increased with the other treatments. (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and acetazolamide treatments reduced the relative number of pendrin-expressing cells in the collecting duct. In a second series, animals were kept for 1 and 2 wk on a low-protein (20%) diet or a high-protein (50%) diet. The high-protein diet slightly increased urinary Cl(-) excretion and strongly stimulated net acid excretion but did not alter pendrin expression. Thus, pendrin expression is primarily correlated with urinary Cl(-) excretion but not blood Cl(-). However, metabolic acidosis caused by acetazolamide or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) loading prevented the increase or even reduced pendrin expression despite low urinary Cl(-) excretion, suggesting an independent regulation by acid-base status.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:09 Dec 2008 12:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:39
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0363-6143
Publisher DOI:10.1152/ajpcell.00419.2008
PubMed ID:18971389
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-7194

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