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Efficient event pattern matching with match windows


Cadonna, Bruno; Gamper, Johann; Böhlen, Michael Hanspeter (2012). Efficient event pattern matching with match windows. In: 18th ACM SIGKDD International Conference, Beijing, China, 12 September 2012 - 16 September 2012, 471-479.

Abstract

In event pattern matching a sequence of input events is matched against a complex query pattern that specifies constraints on extent, order, values, and quantification of matching events. In this paper we propose a general pattern matching strategy that consists of a pre-processing step and a pattern matching step. Instead of eagerly matching incoming events, the pre-processing step buffers events in a match window to apply different pruning techniques (filtering, partitioning, and testing for necessary match conditions). In the second step, an event pattern matching algorithm, A, is called only for match windows that satisfy the necessary match conditions. This two-phase strategy with a lazy call of the matching algorithm significantly reduces the number of events that need to be processed by A as well as the number of calls to A. This is important since pattern matching algorithms tend to be expensive in terms of runtime and memory complexity, whereas the pre-processing can be done very efficiently. We conduct extensive experiments using real-world data with pattern matching algorithms for, respectively, automata and join trees. The experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our strategy for both types of pattern matching algorithms.

Abstract

In event pattern matching a sequence of input events is matched against a complex query pattern that specifies constraints on extent, order, values, and quantification of matching events. In this paper we propose a general pattern matching strategy that consists of a pre-processing step and a pattern matching step. Instead of eagerly matching incoming events, the pre-processing step buffers events in a match window to apply different pruning techniques (filtering, partitioning, and testing for necessary match conditions). In the second step, an event pattern matching algorithm, A, is called only for match windows that satisfy the necessary match conditions. This two-phase strategy with a lazy call of the matching algorithm significantly reduces the number of events that need to be processed by A as well as the number of calls to A. This is important since pattern matching algorithms tend to be expensive in terms of runtime and memory complexity, whereas the pre-processing can be done very efficiently. We conduct extensive experiments using real-world data with pattern matching algorithms for, respectively, automata and join trees. The experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our strategy for both types of pattern matching algorithms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:16 September 2012
Deposited On:29 Jan 2013 09:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:25
Publisher:ACM Press
ISBN:978-1-4503-1462-6
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/2339530.2339607
Related URLs:http://kdd2012.sigkdd.org/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:7764

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