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The labyrinthine morphology of Pronycticebus gaudryi (Primates, Adapiformes)


Lebrun, Renaud; Godinot, Marc; Couette, Sébastien; Tafforeau, Paul; Zollikofer, Christoph P E (2012). The labyrinthine morphology of Pronycticebus gaudryi (Primates, Adapiformes). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, 92(4):527-537.

Abstract

The publication of a well preserved Eocene primate, Darwinius masillae (Cercamoniinae, Notharctidae), has revived the debate on the phylogenetic relationships of Adapiformes and extant primates (Franzen et al., PLos ONE 4(5):e5723, 2009). Recently, Lebrun et al. (J Anat 216:368–380, 2010) showed that the morphology of the bony labyrinth of strepsirrhine primates conveys a strong phylogenetic signal. The study of labyrinthine morphology may thus bring a new piece of evidence to resolve phylogenetic relationships within a group. The investigation of the labyrinthine morphology of another Cercamoniinae, Pronycticebus gaudryi, reveals no synapomorphy with the labyrinths of modern anthropoids. On the contrary, Pronycticebus is closer in labyrinthine shape to extant strepsirrhines, which supports the hypothesis that the Cercamoniinae and other Adapiformes are the sister group of toothcombed primates.

The publication of a well preserved Eocene primate, Darwinius masillae (Cercamoniinae, Notharctidae), has revived the debate on the phylogenetic relationships of Adapiformes and extant primates (Franzen et al., PLos ONE 4(5):e5723, 2009). Recently, Lebrun et al. (J Anat 216:368–380, 2010) showed that the morphology of the bony labyrinth of strepsirrhine primates conveys a strong phylogenetic signal. The study of labyrinthine morphology may thus bring a new piece of evidence to resolve phylogenetic relationships within a group. The investigation of the labyrinthine morphology of another Cercamoniinae, Pronycticebus gaudryi, reveals no synapomorphy with the labyrinths of modern anthropoids. On the contrary, Pronycticebus is closer in labyrinthine shape to extant strepsirrhines, which supports the hypothesis that the Cercamoniinae and other Adapiformes are the sister group of toothcombed primates.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Feb 2013 14:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:26
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1867-1594
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-012-0099-z
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-72497

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