UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process using tooth-borne devices: is it skeletal movement or mainly dental tipping?


Zemann, Wolfgang; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine; Obwegeser, Joachim Anton (2012). Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process using tooth-borne devices: is it skeletal movement or mainly dental tipping? Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 70(6):1292-1299.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process has been introduced as a technique designed to avoid extractions in patients with severe dental crowding. The aim of this study was to quantify the degree of dental tipping within the alveolar segment after distraction osteogenesis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients treated for dental crowding, retruded anterior alveolar process, or flat curves of Spee using segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process were included in the study. Dental-borne distraction devices were used while measuring points, and angles were defined to analyze the amount of dental tipping of the lower incisors after distraction. The measurements were performed using cone-beam computed tomographic scans. Periodontal health (eg, gingival recession, tooth mobility, and dental socket depths) was evaluated after distraction. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were included in the study. The amount of dental tipping within the total movement of the alveolar process showed a mean of 24% after distraction osteogenesis, whereas the skeletal movement was 76%. Dental socket depths and tooth mobility remained at the same levels as those before distraction osteogenesis. In one third of patients, gingival recession was observed around the canines. CONCLUSIONS: Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior process is a powerful technique that can prevent extractions in patients with dental crowding. The technique can also compensate for retruded anterior alveolar process and accelerate or decelerate the curve of Spee. Patients with constricted periodontal health and those with a thin mandibular symphysis, however, cannot be treated with this technique because of the increased risk of dental tipping. Severe gingival recession must also be considered a possible side effect associated with this technique.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process has been introduced as a technique designed to avoid extractions in patients with severe dental crowding. The aim of this study was to quantify the degree of dental tipping within the alveolar segment after distraction osteogenesis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients treated for dental crowding, retruded anterior alveolar process, or flat curves of Spee using segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior alveolar process were included in the study. Dental-borne distraction devices were used while measuring points, and angles were defined to analyze the amount of dental tipping of the lower incisors after distraction. The measurements were performed using cone-beam computed tomographic scans. Periodontal health (eg, gingival recession, tooth mobility, and dental socket depths) was evaluated after distraction. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were included in the study. The amount of dental tipping within the total movement of the alveolar process showed a mean of 24% after distraction osteogenesis, whereas the skeletal movement was 76%. Dental socket depths and tooth mobility remained at the same levels as those before distraction osteogenesis. In one third of patients, gingival recession was observed around the canines. CONCLUSIONS: Segmental distraction osteogenesis of the anterior process is a powerful technique that can prevent extractions in patients with dental crowding. The technique can also compensate for retruded anterior alveolar process and accelerate or decelerate the curve of Spee. Patients with constricted periodontal health and those with a thin mandibular symphysis, however, cannot be treated with this technique because of the increased risk of dental tipping. Severe gingival recession must also be considered a possible side effect associated with this technique.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:06 Feb 2013 18:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0278-2391
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2011.12.007
PubMed ID:22305875

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations