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The global brain semantic web - Interleaving human-machine knowledge and computation


Bernstein, Abraham (2012). The global brain semantic web - Interleaving human-machine knowledge and computation. In: ISWC2012 Workshop on What will the Semantic Web Look Like 10 Years From Now?, Boston, MA, 11 November 2012 - 15 November 2012, 1-6.

Abstract

Abstract. Before the Internet most collaborators had to be sufficiently close by to work together towards a certain goal. Now, the cost of collaborating with anybody anywhere on the world has been reduced to almost zero. As a result large-scale collaboration between humans and computers has become technically feasible. In these collaborative setups humans can carry the part of the weight of processing. Hence, people and computers become a kind of “global brain” of distributed interleaved human-machine computation (often called collective intelligence, social computing, or various other terms). Human computers as part of computational processes, however, come with their own strengths and issues.In this paper we take the underlying ideas of Bernstein et al. [1] regarding three traits on human computation—motivational diversity, cognitive diversity, and error diversity—and discuss them in the light of a Global Brain Semantic Web.

Abstract. Before the Internet most collaborators had to be sufficiently close by to work together towards a certain goal. Now, the cost of collaborating with anybody anywhere on the world has been reduced to almost zero. As a result large-scale collaboration between humans and computers has become technically feasible. In these collaborative setups humans can carry the part of the weight of processing. Hence, people and computers become a kind of “global brain” of distributed interleaved human-machine computation (often called collective intelligence, social computing, or various other terms). Human computers as part of computational processes, however, come with their own strengths and issues.In this paper we take the underlying ideas of Bernstein et al. [1] regarding three traits on human computation—motivational diversity, cognitive diversity, and error diversity—and discuss them in the light of a Global Brain Semantic Web.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:15 November 2012
Deposited On:05 Feb 2013 11:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:29
Additional Information:In conjunction with the 11th International Semantic Web Conference 2012 (ISWC 2012)
Official URL:htthttp://stko.geog.ucsb.edu/sw2022/sw2022_paper1.pdf
Related URLs:http://stko.geog.ucsb.edu/sw2022/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:7282
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-73180

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