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Self-efficacy and self-esteem as predictors of participation in spinal cord injury--an ICF-based study


Geyh, S; Nick, E; Stirnimann, D; Ehrat, S; Michel, F; Peter, C; Lude, P (2012). Self-efficacy and self-esteem as predictors of participation in spinal cord injury--an ICF-based study. Spinal Cord, 50(9):699-706.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: A multi-centre cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of self-efficacy and self-esteem with participation of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) from a comprehensive bio-psycho-social perspective, based on the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). SETTING: Community-dwelling participants, <5 years post discharge, recruited through three SCI rehabilitation centers in Switzerland. METHODS: Data were collected by means of standardized self-report questionnaires sent to the eligible participants by postal mail. The questionnaires covered the different components of the ICF's bio-psycho-social model, namely health conditions, body functions, participation, environmental and personal factors. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses with participation as the dependent variable have been conducted. RESULTS: In all, 102 persons with SCI answered the survey, response rate 25.9%. Self-esteem (r=0.61) and self-efficacy (r=0.54) correlated highly with participation and were the strongest correlates of participation. They were stronger correlates of participation than symptoms of anxiety, depressive symptoms, pain, health conditions, social support, coping styles or sense of coherence. Participation seemed to be independent of gender, age, level or completeness of injury. Self-efficacy and self-esteem explained together with time since discharge and years of education 48% of the variance in participation adjusting for health condition, depressive symptoms, pain interference and social support. CONCLUSION: Considering self-efficacy and self-esteem within the comprehensive framework of the ICF can contribute to a better understanding of functioning, disability and health in SCI, which in turn may facilitate the development of interventions to support the persons' adjustment and reintegration.

STUDY DESIGN: A multi-centre cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of self-efficacy and self-esteem with participation of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) from a comprehensive bio-psycho-social perspective, based on the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). SETTING: Community-dwelling participants, <5 years post discharge, recruited through three SCI rehabilitation centers in Switzerland. METHODS: Data were collected by means of standardized self-report questionnaires sent to the eligible participants by postal mail. The questionnaires covered the different components of the ICF's bio-psycho-social model, namely health conditions, body functions, participation, environmental and personal factors. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses with participation as the dependent variable have been conducted. RESULTS: In all, 102 persons with SCI answered the survey, response rate 25.9%. Self-esteem (r=0.61) and self-efficacy (r=0.54) correlated highly with participation and were the strongest correlates of participation. They were stronger correlates of participation than symptoms of anxiety, depressive symptoms, pain, health conditions, social support, coping styles or sense of coherence. Participation seemed to be independent of gender, age, level or completeness of injury. Self-efficacy and self-esteem explained together with time since discharge and years of education 48% of the variance in participation adjusting for health condition, depressive symptoms, pain interference and social support. CONCLUSION: Considering self-efficacy and self-esteem within the comprehensive framework of the ICF can contribute to a better understanding of functioning, disability and health in SCI, which in turn may facilitate the development of interventions to support the persons' adjustment and reintegration.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2012
Deposited On:05 Feb 2013 14:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:29
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2012.18
PubMed ID:22450885

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