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The hypoxia-induced paralogs Scylla and Charybdis inhibit growth by down-regulating S6K activity upstream of TSC in Drosophila.


Reiling, J H; Hafen, E (2004). The hypoxia-induced paralogs Scylla and Charybdis inhibit growth by down-regulating S6K activity upstream of TSC in Drosophila. Genes and Development, 18(23):2879-2892.

Abstract

Diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues must be integrated within a developing organism to ensure appropriate growth at the cellular and organismal level. In Drosophila, the insulin receptor/TOR/S6K signaling network plays a fundamental role in the control of metabolism and cell growth. Here we show that scylla and charybdis, two homologous genes identified as growth suppressors in an EP (enhancer/promoter) overexpression screen, act as negative regulators of growth. The simultaneous loss of both genes generates flies that are more susceptible to reduced oxygen concentrations (hypoxia) and that show mild overgrowth phenotypes. Conversely, scylla or charybdis overactivation reduces growth. Growth inhibition is associated with a reduction in S6K but not PKB/Akt activity. Together, genetic and biochemical analysis places Scylla/Charybdis downstream of PKB and upstream of TSC. Furthermore, we show that scylla and charybdis are induced under hypoxic conditions and that scylla is a target of Drosophila HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) like its mammalian counterpart RTP801/REDD1, thus establishing a potential cross-talk between growth and oxygen sensing.

Diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues must be integrated within a developing organism to ensure appropriate growth at the cellular and organismal level. In Drosophila, the insulin receptor/TOR/S6K signaling network plays a fundamental role in the control of metabolism and cell growth. Here we show that scylla and charybdis, two homologous genes identified as growth suppressors in an EP (enhancer/promoter) overexpression screen, act as negative regulators of growth. The simultaneous loss of both genes generates flies that are more susceptible to reduced oxygen concentrations (hypoxia) and that show mild overgrowth phenotypes. Conversely, scylla or charybdis overactivation reduces growth. Growth inhibition is associated with a reduction in S6K but not PKB/Akt activity. Together, genetic and biochemical analysis places Scylla/Charybdis downstream of PKB and upstream of TSC. Furthermore, we show that scylla and charybdis are induced under hypoxic conditions and that scylla is a target of Drosophila HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) like its mammalian counterpart RTP801/REDD1, thus establishing a potential cross-talk between growth and oxygen sensing.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 December 2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
ISSN:0890-9369
Publisher DOI:10.1101/gad.322704
PubMed ID:15545626
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-737

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