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Physical student-robot interaction with the ETHZ haptic paddle


Gassert, Roger; Metzger, Jean-Claude; Leuenberger, Kaspar; Popp, Werner L; Tucker, Michael R; Viganu, Bogdan; Zimmermann, Raphael; Lambercy, Olivier (2013). Physical student-robot interaction with the ETHZ haptic paddle. IEEE Transactions on Education, 56(1):9-17.

Abstract

Abstract—Haptic paddles — low-cost one-degree-of-freedom force feedback devices — have been used with great success at several universities throughout the United States to teach the basic concepts of dynamic systems and physical human-robot interaction (pHRI) to students. The ETHZ haptic paddle was developed for a new pHRI course offered in the undergraduate Mechatronics Focus track of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum at ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
Twenty students engaged in this two-hour weekly lecture over the 14 weeks of the autumn 2011 semester, complemented by a weekly two-hour laboratory session with the ETHZ haptic paddle. In pairs, students worked through three common sets of experiments before embarking on a specialization project that investigated one of several advanced topics such as impedance control with force feedback, admittance control, the effect of velocity estimation on stability or electromyographic control. For these projects students received additional hardware, including force sensors, electro-optical encoders or high-performance data acquisition cards. The learning objectives were developed in the context of an accompanying faculty development program at ETH Zurich; a set of interactive sequences and the oral exam were explicitly aligned to these learning objectives. The outcomes of the specialization project presentations and oral exams, and a student evaluation of the course, demonstrated that the ETHZ haptic paddle is a valuable tool that allows students to quite literally grasp abstract principles such as mechanical impedance, passivity and human factors, and helps students create a tangible link between theory and practice in the highly interdisciplinary field of pHRI.
Index Terms—Dynamic systems, hands-on laboratory, haptics, human factors, performance metrics, physical human-robot interaction (pHRI), psychophysics, specialization projects.

Abstract—Haptic paddles — low-cost one-degree-of-freedom force feedback devices — have been used with great success at several universities throughout the United States to teach the basic concepts of dynamic systems and physical human-robot interaction (pHRI) to students. The ETHZ haptic paddle was developed for a new pHRI course offered in the undergraduate Mechatronics Focus track of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum at ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
Twenty students engaged in this two-hour weekly lecture over the 14 weeks of the autumn 2011 semester, complemented by a weekly two-hour laboratory session with the ETHZ haptic paddle. In pairs, students worked through three common sets of experiments before embarking on a specialization project that investigated one of several advanced topics such as impedance control with force feedback, admittance control, the effect of velocity estimation on stability or electromyographic control. For these projects students received additional hardware, including force sensors, electro-optical encoders or high-performance data acquisition cards. The learning objectives were developed in the context of an accompanying faculty development program at ETH Zurich; a set of interactive sequences and the oral exam were explicitly aligned to these learning objectives. The outcomes of the specialization project presentations and oral exams, and a student evaluation of the course, demonstrated that the ETHZ haptic paddle is a valuable tool that allows students to quite literally grasp abstract principles such as mechanical impedance, passivity and human factors, and helps students create a tangible link between theory and practice in the highly interdisciplinary field of pHRI.
Index Terms—Dynamic systems, hands-on laboratory, haptics, human factors, performance metrics, physical human-robot interaction (pHRI), psychophysics, specialization projects.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:21 Feb 2013 09:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:31
Publisher:Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISSN:0018-9359
Additional Information:© 2013 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/TE.2012.2219310
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-73846

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