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Whole-genome analysis reveals a strong positional bias of conserved dMyc-dependent E-boxes.


Hulf, T; Bellosta, P; Furrer, M; Steiger, D; Svensson, D; Barbour, A D; Gallant, P (2005). Whole-genome analysis reveals a strong positional bias of conserved dMyc-dependent E-boxes. Molecular and Cellular Biology, 25(9):3401-3410.

Abstract

Myc is a transcription factor with diverse biological effects ranging from the control of cellular proliferation and growth to the induction of apoptosis. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional targets of the sole Myc ortholog in Drosophila melanogaster, dMyc. We show that the genes that are down-regulated in response to dmyc inhibition are largely identical to those that are up-regulated after dMyc overexpression and that many of them play a role in growth control. The promoter regions of these targets are characterized by the presence of the E-box sequence CACGTG, a known dMyc binding site. Surprisingly, a large subgroup of (functionally related) dMyc targets contains a single E-box located within the first 100 nucleotides after the transcription start site. The relevance of this E-box and its position was confirmed by a mutational analysis of a selected dMyc target and by the observation of its evolutionary conservation in a different Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura. These observations raise the possibility that a subset of Myc targets share a distinct regulatory mechanism.

Myc is a transcription factor with diverse biological effects ranging from the control of cellular proliferation and growth to the induction of apoptosis. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional targets of the sole Myc ortholog in Drosophila melanogaster, dMyc. We show that the genes that are down-regulated in response to dmyc inhibition are largely identical to those that are up-regulated after dMyc overexpression and that many of them play a role in growth control. The promoter regions of these targets are characterized by the presence of the E-box sequence CACGTG, a known dMyc binding site. Surprisingly, a large subgroup of (functionally related) dMyc targets contains a single E-box located within the first 100 nucleotides after the transcription start site. The relevance of this E-box and its position was confirmed by a mutational analysis of a selected dMyc target and by the observation of its evolutionary conservation in a different Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura. These observations raise the possibility that a subset of Myc targets share a distinct regulatory mechanism.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1 May 2005
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
ISSN:0270-7306
Publisher DOI:10.1128/MCB.25.9.3401-3410.2005
PubMed ID:15831447
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-742

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