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Quick job entry or long-term human capital development? The dynamic effects of alternative training schemes


Osikominu, Aderonke (2013). Quick job entry or long-term human capital development? The dynamic effects of alternative training schemes. Review of Economic Studies, 80(1):313-342.

Abstract

This paper investigates how precisely short-term, job-search oriented training programs as opposed to long-term, human capital intensive training programs
work. We evaluate and compare their effects on time until job entry, stability of employment, and earnings. Further, we examine the heterogeneity of treatment effects according to the timing of training during unemployment as well as across different subgroups of participants. We find that participating in short-term training reduces the remaining time in unemployment and moderately increases job stability.
Long-term training programs initially prolong the remaining time in unemployment, but once the scheduled program end is reached participants exit to employment at a much faster rate than without training. In addition, they benefit from substantially more stable employment spells and higher earnings. Overall, long-term training programs are well effective in supporting the occupational advancement of very heterogeneous groups of participants, including those with generally weak labor market prospects. However, from a fiscal perspective only the low-cost short-term training schemes are cost efficient in the short run.

This paper investigates how precisely short-term, job-search oriented training programs as opposed to long-term, human capital intensive training programs
work. We evaluate and compare their effects on time until job entry, stability of employment, and earnings. Further, we examine the heterogeneity of treatment effects according to the timing of training during unemployment as well as across different subgroups of participants. We find that participating in short-term training reduces the remaining time in unemployment and moderately increases job stability.
Long-term training programs initially prolong the remaining time in unemployment, but once the scheduled program end is reached participants exit to employment at a much faster rate than without training. In addition, they benefit from substantially more stable employment spells and higher earnings. Overall, long-term training programs are well effective in supporting the occupational advancement of very heterogeneous groups of participants, including those with generally weak labor market prospects. However, from a fiscal perspective only the low-cost short-term training schemes are cost efficient in the short run.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:January 2013
Deposited On:15 Feb 2013 16:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:33
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0034-6527
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Review of Economic Studies (Volume 80, Issue 1, 313-342, 2013) is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/restud/rds022
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/restud/rds022
Related URLs:http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-62419
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-74467

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