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Measuring the in vivo behavior of soft tissue and organs using the aspiration device


Hollenstein, M; Bajka, M; Röhrnbauer, B; Badir, S; Mazza, E (2012). Measuring the in vivo behavior of soft tissue and organs using the aspiration device. In: Payan, Y. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery. Heidelberg: Springer, 201-228.

Abstract

The aspiration technique is used to characterize the mechanical behavior of soft human tissues. This method has been applied intra-operatively on human liver as well as on the uterine cervix during gestation. Further applications are on other abdominal organs as well as on the vaginal wall. The experimental set-up, the measurement protocol and the procedure for data analysis are described in this paper. Application on human organs aimed at (i) tissue classification towards development of novel diagnostic procedures, and (ii) determining constitutive models of soft biological tissue. The first goal is achieved using scalar parameters extracted from pressure and deformation profile histories. Determination of parameters for non-linear time dependent constitutive model formulations requires solving the inverse problem. Observations from on-going and recently completed clinical studies on liver, uterine cervix and vaginal wall are summarized in order to illustrate advantages and limitations of the aspiration technique.

The aspiration technique is used to characterize the mechanical behavior of soft human tissues. This method has been applied intra-operatively on human liver as well as on the uterine cervix during gestation. Further applications are on other abdominal organs as well as on the vaginal wall. The experimental set-up, the measurement protocol and the procedure for data analysis are described in this paper. Application on human organs aimed at (i) tissue classification towards development of novel diagnostic procedures, and (ii) determining constitutive models of soft biological tissue. The first goal is achieved using scalar parameters extracted from pressure and deformation profile histories. Determination of parameters for non-linear time dependent constitutive model formulations requires solving the inverse problem. Observations from on-going and recently completed clinical studies on liver, uterine cervix and vaginal wall are summarized in order to illustrate advantages and limitations of the aspiration technique.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gynecology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Mar 2013 10:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:34
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials
Number:11
ISSN:1868-2006
ISBN:978-3-642-29013-8
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/8415_2012_120
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=007330336
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-74762

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