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Imaging the right heart: the use of integrated multimodality imaging


Valsangiacomo Büchel, Emanuela R; Mertens, Luc L (2012). Imaging the right heart: the use of integrated multimodality imaging. European Heart Journal, 33(8):949-960.

Abstract

During recent years, right ventricular (RV) structure and function have been found to be an important determinant of outcome in different cardiovascular and also pulmonary diseases. Currently, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging are the two imaging modalities most commonly used to visualize the RV. Most structural abnormalities of the RV can be reliably described by echocardiography but due its complex geometrical shape, echocardiographic assessment of RV function is more challenging. Newer promising echocardiographic techniques are emerging but lack of validation and limited normal reference data influence their routine clinical application. Cardiac magnetic resonance is generally considered the clinical reference technique due to its unlimited imaging planes, superior image resolution, and three-dimensional volumetric rendering. The accuracy and reliability of CMR measurements make it the ideal tool for serial examinations of RV function. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) plays an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary emboli but can also be used for assessing RV ischaemic disease or as an alternative for CMR if contra-indicated. Radionuclide techniques have become more obsolete in the current era. The different imaging modalities should be considered complimentary and each plays a role for different indications.

During recent years, right ventricular (RV) structure and function have been found to be an important determinant of outcome in different cardiovascular and also pulmonary diseases. Currently, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging are the two imaging modalities most commonly used to visualize the RV. Most structural abnormalities of the RV can be reliably described by echocardiography but due its complex geometrical shape, echocardiographic assessment of RV function is more challenging. Newer promising echocardiographic techniques are emerging but lack of validation and limited normal reference data influence their routine clinical application. Cardiac magnetic resonance is generally considered the clinical reference technique due to its unlimited imaging planes, superior image resolution, and three-dimensional volumetric rendering. The accuracy and reliability of CMR measurements make it the ideal tool for serial examinations of RV function. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) plays an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary emboli but can also be used for assessing RV ischaemic disease or as an alternative for CMR if contra-indicated. Radionuclide techniques have become more obsolete in the current era. The different imaging modalities should be considered complimentary and each plays a role for different indications.

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35 citations in Web of Science®
65 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Mar 2013 13:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:34
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehr490
PubMed ID:22408035
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-74769

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